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Auction archive: Lot number 114

Attributed to Rubens Peale View of Belfield, circa 1869

Estimate
US$15,000 - US$25,000
Price realised:
US$40,625
Auction archive: Lot number 114

Attributed to Rubens Peale View of Belfield, circa 1869

Estimate
US$15,000 - US$25,000
Price realised:
US$40,625
Beschreibung:

Attributed to Rubens Peale View of Belfield, circa 1869 View of Belfield, circa 1869 Bears inscription View of Charles W. Peale Homestead Near Germantown/Copied from his original by Rubens Peale for his daughter Mary Jane Peale on the stretcher Oil on canvas laid to panel 28 1/8 x 36 1/8 inches Provenance: The artist Mary Jane Peale (included in an 1884 list of paintings owned by Mary Jane Peale and also mentioned in her will) Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Weisenburg, Wynnewood, PA Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York Exhibited: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, date unknown (lent by Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Weisenburg, Wynnewood, PA) New London, CT, Lyman Allyn Museum, American Romantic Paintings of the 18th and 19th Centuries from the Collection of Lee B. Anderson, Feb. 26-Mar. 26, 1961, no. 62, as Belfield, The Peale Homestead Literature: Jesse Poesch, Germantown Landscapes: a Peale Family Amusement, Antiques 72 [Nov. 1957, p. 439]. Lillian B. Miller, et al, The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870, Washington, DC, 1996, pp. 172, 174, 183, 291 (footnote 25) Andrew Weisenburg was married to Helen Elizabeth Mills (1885-...). Born in 1885 in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. Charles Krasner Mills and his wife Clara Elizabeth Peale, and was a practicing artist. She married Andrew Weisenburg of Philadelphia on September 4, 1918. In 1810, Charles Willson Peale moved with his third wife, Hannah, to Belfield, a farm outside Philadelphia. Over the ensuing decade, he developed the property into a pleasure garden that eventually attracted many visitors. His son, Rubens planted the gardens, which Charles Willson Peale painted in 1816. Paul D. Schweizer discussed the painting extensively in his essay, "Fruits of Perseverance: The Art of Rubens Peale 1855-1865" ["The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870," Washington, DC, 1996, pp. 172, 174]: "... in the summer of 1869, Rubens began painting The Garden at Belfield (private collection), a copy of his father's View of the Garden at Belfield and one of his most ambitious landscapes... Although this may be the only work by Charles Willson that Rubens ever copied, it would be a mistake to regard this as a measure of Charles Willson's influence on his son... 'I am now eighty years and seven months of age,' Rubens remarked in a letter to this historian, Benson Lossing, 'and hope to make improvement in the art.' In doing so, he became the only member of his family who pursued four of his father's occupations: agriculturalist, naturalist, museum manager, and artist. "It is significant that the only work by Charles Willson that Rubens copied was a landscape that his father had painted more for amuseument than anything else. Peale's View of the Garden at Belfield depicted the garden Rubens had planted at the Germantown farm as a young man. The painting, therefore, had special significance for him... When he and Mrs. Peale visited Belfield on July 7, 1857, he remarked proudly in his journal that the farm's owners 'keep up the garden as I left it, the trees that I planted are now grown to an immense size, scarcely to be recognized by me.' The opportunity to copy the painting occurred three years later, when his daughter Mary Jane, in response to her mother's pleas that she should 'try and bring something new for . . . [Rubens] to copy' when she returned to the farm from Washington, D.C., arranged to have Charles Willson's painting sent to him. Rubens's enthusiasm about copying the picture may also have been sparked by the recollection that his father had originally called the place Farm Persevere, a name that would have reminded Rubens of the encouragement he had received as a boy from Benjamin Franklin " Dr. Schweizer believes that the present work may possibly be the landscape depicted on the rear wall in Rubens Peale in his Studio, painted by Rubens Peale with Mary Jane Peale circa 1860-62 ["The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870," Washington, DC, 1996, fig. 5.8, p.
Note on label on reverse from Restorer, Hannah Mee Horner, May 19, 1937: "Rebacked and restored" Frame rubbing. Dirty, dense varnish and surface grime. There is scattered inpaint throughout the sky, and touches in the building at the center. There is a repaired hole in the sky at the center left, diameter approximately 1/2 inch, and a second repaired hole in the sky in the upper left corner, diameter approximately 1/2 inch. There are touches of inpaint in the tree at the center left and in the windows of the greenhouse at center.

Auction archive: Lot number 114
Auction:
Datum:
19 Nov 2012
Auction house:
Doyle New York - Auctioneers & Appraisers
East 87th Street 75
New York, NY 10128
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)212 4272730
Beschreibung:

Attributed to Rubens Peale View of Belfield, circa 1869 View of Belfield, circa 1869 Bears inscription View of Charles W. Peale Homestead Near Germantown/Copied from his original by Rubens Peale for his daughter Mary Jane Peale on the stretcher Oil on canvas laid to panel 28 1/8 x 36 1/8 inches Provenance: The artist Mary Jane Peale (included in an 1884 list of paintings owned by Mary Jane Peale and also mentioned in her will) Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Weisenburg, Wynnewood, PA Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York Exhibited: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, date unknown (lent by Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Weisenburg, Wynnewood, PA) New London, CT, Lyman Allyn Museum, American Romantic Paintings of the 18th and 19th Centuries from the Collection of Lee B. Anderson, Feb. 26-Mar. 26, 1961, no. 62, as Belfield, The Peale Homestead Literature: Jesse Poesch, Germantown Landscapes: a Peale Family Amusement, Antiques 72 [Nov. 1957, p. 439]. Lillian B. Miller, et al, The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870, Washington, DC, 1996, pp. 172, 174, 183, 291 (footnote 25) Andrew Weisenburg was married to Helen Elizabeth Mills (1885-...). Born in 1885 in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. Charles Krasner Mills and his wife Clara Elizabeth Peale, and was a practicing artist. She married Andrew Weisenburg of Philadelphia on September 4, 1918. In 1810, Charles Willson Peale moved with his third wife, Hannah, to Belfield, a farm outside Philadelphia. Over the ensuing decade, he developed the property into a pleasure garden that eventually attracted many visitors. His son, Rubens planted the gardens, which Charles Willson Peale painted in 1816. Paul D. Schweizer discussed the painting extensively in his essay, "Fruits of Perseverance: The Art of Rubens Peale 1855-1865" ["The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870," Washington, DC, 1996, pp. 172, 174]: "... in the summer of 1869, Rubens began painting The Garden at Belfield (private collection), a copy of his father's View of the Garden at Belfield and one of his most ambitious landscapes... Although this may be the only work by Charles Willson that Rubens ever copied, it would be a mistake to regard this as a measure of Charles Willson's influence on his son... 'I am now eighty years and seven months of age,' Rubens remarked in a letter to this historian, Benson Lossing, 'and hope to make improvement in the art.' In doing so, he became the only member of his family who pursued four of his father's occupations: agriculturalist, naturalist, museum manager, and artist. "It is significant that the only work by Charles Willson that Rubens copied was a landscape that his father had painted more for amuseument than anything else. Peale's View of the Garden at Belfield depicted the garden Rubens had planted at the Germantown farm as a young man. The painting, therefore, had special significance for him... When he and Mrs. Peale visited Belfield on July 7, 1857, he remarked proudly in his journal that the farm's owners 'keep up the garden as I left it, the trees that I planted are now grown to an immense size, scarcely to be recognized by me.' The opportunity to copy the painting occurred three years later, when his daughter Mary Jane, in response to her mother's pleas that she should 'try and bring something new for . . . [Rubens] to copy' when she returned to the farm from Washington, D.C., arranged to have Charles Willson's painting sent to him. Rubens's enthusiasm about copying the picture may also have been sparked by the recollection that his father had originally called the place Farm Persevere, a name that would have reminded Rubens of the encouragement he had received as a boy from Benjamin Franklin " Dr. Schweizer believes that the present work may possibly be the landscape depicted on the rear wall in Rubens Peale in his Studio, painted by Rubens Peale with Mary Jane Peale circa 1860-62 ["The Peale Family: Creation of a Legacy, 1770-1870," Washington, DC, 1996, fig. 5.8, p.
Note on label on reverse from Restorer, Hannah Mee Horner, May 19, 1937: "Rebacked and restored" Frame rubbing. Dirty, dense varnish and surface grime. There is scattered inpaint throughout the sky, and touches in the building at the center. There is a repaired hole in the sky at the center left, diameter approximately 1/2 inch, and a second repaired hole in the sky in the upper left corner, diameter approximately 1/2 inch. There are touches of inpaint in the tree at the center left and in the windows of the greenhouse at center.

Auction archive: Lot number 114
Auction:
Datum:
19 Nov 2012
Auction house:
Doyle New York - Auctioneers & Appraisers
East 87th Street 75
New York, NY 10128
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)212 4272730
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