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Auction archive: Lot number 394

Cabinet Cards of Sioux Indians by Enno Meyer, Cincinnati, OH

Estimate
n. a.
Price realised:
US$1,020
Auction archive: Lot number 394

Cabinet Cards of Sioux Indians by Enno Meyer, Cincinnati, OH

Estimate
n. a.
Price realised:
US$1,020
Beschreibung:

Lot of 8 cabinet cards, including 6 credited to J.H. Meyer (Enno Meyer), Cincinnati, OH, and 2 uncredited. Photographs feature Sicangu Lakota Sioux Indians at the Cincinnati Zoo, posed with headdresses, blankets, beaded bands, moccasins, breastplates, and other apparel. One image shows two Indian women with two small children, and a man holding what appears to be a belt under a tree in the background. Cincinnati photographer, Enno Meyer (1874-1947), graduated from the Art Academy of Cincinnati in 1897, ready to get more field experience outside of his father's studio. Due to his particular interest in animals, Meyer became involved with the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens, where he would take photographs of the animals for the zoo, and study and draw the animals for his own delight. This connection with the zoo led Meyer to a rare opportunity to photograph, and befriend, western Indians who had come to live at the zoo. In the summer of 1895, a group of Cree men, women, and children from Montana became stranded in Bellevue, Kentucky, due to a failed wild west show. Knowing that the group needed to procure funds to travel back to their home, the Cincinnati Zoo offered to allow the Cree to set up camp on zoo grounds, and perform wild west-type shows for zoo visitors. Through this process, the zoo raised its revenue, the Indians made enough money to make it back to Montana, and Enno Meyer was given a change to photograph Indians in a make-shift Indian village. Due to the all-around success of that arrangement, the zoo contacted a group of Sicangu Lakota Sioux from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, inviting them to come out the following summer and do what the Cree before them had done. The Sioux took the zoo up on the offer, and a group of 89 men, women, and children traveled with their horses, tepees, and other belongings to Cincinnati in June of 1896. They set up camp, performed wild west-type shows, and even welcomed visitors into their village, making friends with many of them. Some Cincinnatians even invited the Sicangu to their own homes, taking them around town to see the sights, go shopping, and experience city living. Enno Meyer became rather close to the Sicangu, providing much-desired photographs for them to take back home and give to friends and family. They actually gave him some of their artifacts to keep as a trade for the pictures he produced, and remained in contact with him after their return to the Rosebud Reservation. Source: Greenland, Lory. “Connections in the Collections: Cincinnati Museum Center’s Enno Meyer Collection” Ohio Valley History 17, no. 3 (Fall 2017). Project Muse. Condition: Cabinet cards in good condition. One with imperfection at upper right corner, and all with wear to mount edges.

Auction archive: Lot number 394
Auction:
Datum:
28 Jul 2018
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
Beschreibung:

Lot of 8 cabinet cards, including 6 credited to J.H. Meyer (Enno Meyer), Cincinnati, OH, and 2 uncredited. Photographs feature Sicangu Lakota Sioux Indians at the Cincinnati Zoo, posed with headdresses, blankets, beaded bands, moccasins, breastplates, and other apparel. One image shows two Indian women with two small children, and a man holding what appears to be a belt under a tree in the background. Cincinnati photographer, Enno Meyer (1874-1947), graduated from the Art Academy of Cincinnati in 1897, ready to get more field experience outside of his father's studio. Due to his particular interest in animals, Meyer became involved with the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens, where he would take photographs of the animals for the zoo, and study and draw the animals for his own delight. This connection with the zoo led Meyer to a rare opportunity to photograph, and befriend, western Indians who had come to live at the zoo. In the summer of 1895, a group of Cree men, women, and children from Montana became stranded in Bellevue, Kentucky, due to a failed wild west show. Knowing that the group needed to procure funds to travel back to their home, the Cincinnati Zoo offered to allow the Cree to set up camp on zoo grounds, and perform wild west-type shows for zoo visitors. Through this process, the zoo raised its revenue, the Indians made enough money to make it back to Montana, and Enno Meyer was given a change to photograph Indians in a make-shift Indian village. Due to the all-around success of that arrangement, the zoo contacted a group of Sicangu Lakota Sioux from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, inviting them to come out the following summer and do what the Cree before them had done. The Sioux took the zoo up on the offer, and a group of 89 men, women, and children traveled with their horses, tepees, and other belongings to Cincinnati in June of 1896. They set up camp, performed wild west-type shows, and even welcomed visitors into their village, making friends with many of them. Some Cincinnatians even invited the Sicangu to their own homes, taking them around town to see the sights, go shopping, and experience city living. Enno Meyer became rather close to the Sicangu, providing much-desired photographs for them to take back home and give to friends and family. They actually gave him some of their artifacts to keep as a trade for the pictures he produced, and remained in contact with him after their return to the Rosebud Reservation. Source: Greenland, Lory. “Connections in the Collections: Cincinnati Museum Center’s Enno Meyer Collection” Ohio Valley History 17, no. 3 (Fall 2017). Project Muse. Condition: Cabinet cards in good condition. One with imperfection at upper right corner, and all with wear to mount edges.

Auction archive: Lot number 394
Auction:
Datum:
28 Jul 2018
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
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