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Auction archive: Lot number 98

Confederate POW William T. Colquitt, 1st Tennessee Infantry, Co. H, the "Maury Grays," Civil War Archive, Incl. Letters Written from Rock Island Prison

Estimate
n. a.
Price realised:
US$2,880
Auction archive: Lot number 98

Confederate POW William T. Colquitt, 1st Tennessee Infantry, Co. H, the "Maury Grays," Civil War Archive, Incl. Letters Written from Rock Island Prison

Estimate
n. a.
Price realised:
US$2,880
Beschreibung:

Lot of 20, including 18 Civil War letters written by William T. Colquitt, a small child's chair made by Colquitt, ca 1840s, and a book regarding Rock Island Prison. William T. Colquitt was born in Columbia, TN in 1835. His father was a carpenter who owned several slaves. His mother and sister were accomplished piano players and his brother raised a small family. Colquitt worked as a carpenter until he enlisted in the Maury Grays, Co. H, in the spring of 1861. Like most men on both sides, he expected a short term of service and was optimistic at the start. However, he soon became disenchanted with the idea of war and the Confederacy. During the first year of his service he wrote home: During the time of our travel we passed several very pretty towns and a great number of our wounded men were at the hospitals. They was in a big fight at Mansy Junction. I had the pleasure of talking with a number of them. They gave me a very accurate account of the battle. They routed the yanks very bad, killed thousands and thousands of them but didn’t know the number…Son soon as our men got [the artillery and wagons] they commenced a heavy fire on the cowardly rascals and they fell like stalks before the sythe (Bath County, VA, July 30). Romney is about thirty miles from this place and the enemy is about sixty or eighty thousand strong and I understand well fortified I am very sure we will whip them but it will be a bloody fight indeed, there will be many good southerner who will have to bite the dust and I may be one of the number but god grant that I may come through well and sound. I am not much afraid if I was I would have stayed home but I hope in a few more months to return home and find you all engaged in the same great blessing (Winchester, December 29, 1861). By the spring of 1862, the tone of his letters changed dramatically especially after the Confederate Congress passed the Conscription Act, which made all able bodied white men between the ages of 18 and 35 liable for a three year term of service. Coliquitt’s year of service suddenly became a three year sentence. A private is looked upon to be as good as a negro but not any better, he wrote. My opinion is that this is a very unholy and unjust war brought on by political men who are now reaping the benefit of office and in no danger of getting hurt (Knoxville, March 10, 1862). While some politicians grew fat, many Confederate soldiers starved. I have no dout that you hear we get plenty to eat but I can tell you it’s a mistake, he wrote. We get just enough to make one meal per day if it was not for the few potatoes we buy I don’t know what we would do (Chattanooga, August 18, 1863). Despite his dislike of the service, his brother George still wanted to enlist. This country is not worth 25 cents to cash it would be a good act if the South would make the yanky a present of it so stay home George, wrote Colquitt (no date). Rations remained low and proper equipment became more scarce. We poor Rebs are having a very hard time going naked starving and working on fortifications five hours every day, wrote Coliquitt. I think the times are very gloomy for the South the soldiers in our part of the army are very much disheartened and demorilised…I will try and stay until the first of next May which will be the expiration of our time you may then expect us all who are able to walk for we are coming not only a few but a very good force we are determined to get there or die in trying to get home (Chattanooga, August 18, 1863). He tried to run home after the Battle at Mission Ridge, but Union soldiers captured him and sent him to Rock Island prison in Illinois. Tell brother to try and have me releast there has been several left this prison by taking the oath so I want him to see Gov Johnson and through him I think he can get me releast, he wrote (Rock Island, Barracks 25, April 12, 1864). His family was unable to coordinate his release because they were no longer accepting applications. Colquitt wa

Auction archive: Lot number 98
Auction:
Datum:
17 Aug 2017
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
info@cowans.com
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
Beschreibung:

Lot of 20, including 18 Civil War letters written by William T. Colquitt, a small child's chair made by Colquitt, ca 1840s, and a book regarding Rock Island Prison. William T. Colquitt was born in Columbia, TN in 1835. His father was a carpenter who owned several slaves. His mother and sister were accomplished piano players and his brother raised a small family. Colquitt worked as a carpenter until he enlisted in the Maury Grays, Co. H, in the spring of 1861. Like most men on both sides, he expected a short term of service and was optimistic at the start. However, he soon became disenchanted with the idea of war and the Confederacy. During the first year of his service he wrote home: During the time of our travel we passed several very pretty towns and a great number of our wounded men were at the hospitals. They was in a big fight at Mansy Junction. I had the pleasure of talking with a number of them. They gave me a very accurate account of the battle. They routed the yanks very bad, killed thousands and thousands of them but didn’t know the number…Son soon as our men got [the artillery and wagons] they commenced a heavy fire on the cowardly rascals and they fell like stalks before the sythe (Bath County, VA, July 30). Romney is about thirty miles from this place and the enemy is about sixty or eighty thousand strong and I understand well fortified I am very sure we will whip them but it will be a bloody fight indeed, there will be many good southerner who will have to bite the dust and I may be one of the number but god grant that I may come through well and sound. I am not much afraid if I was I would have stayed home but I hope in a few more months to return home and find you all engaged in the same great blessing (Winchester, December 29, 1861). By the spring of 1862, the tone of his letters changed dramatically especially after the Confederate Congress passed the Conscription Act, which made all able bodied white men between the ages of 18 and 35 liable for a three year term of service. Coliquitt’s year of service suddenly became a three year sentence. A private is looked upon to be as good as a negro but not any better, he wrote. My opinion is that this is a very unholy and unjust war brought on by political men who are now reaping the benefit of office and in no danger of getting hurt (Knoxville, March 10, 1862). While some politicians grew fat, many Confederate soldiers starved. I have no dout that you hear we get plenty to eat but I can tell you it’s a mistake, he wrote. We get just enough to make one meal per day if it was not for the few potatoes we buy I don’t know what we would do (Chattanooga, August 18, 1863). Despite his dislike of the service, his brother George still wanted to enlist. This country is not worth 25 cents to cash it would be a good act if the South would make the yanky a present of it so stay home George, wrote Colquitt (no date). Rations remained low and proper equipment became more scarce. We poor Rebs are having a very hard time going naked starving and working on fortifications five hours every day, wrote Coliquitt. I think the times are very gloomy for the South the soldiers in our part of the army are very much disheartened and demorilised…I will try and stay until the first of next May which will be the expiration of our time you may then expect us all who are able to walk for we are coming not only a few but a very good force we are determined to get there or die in trying to get home (Chattanooga, August 18, 1863). He tried to run home after the Battle at Mission Ridge, but Union soldiers captured him and sent him to Rock Island prison in Illinois. Tell brother to try and have me releast there has been several left this prison by taking the oath so I want him to see Gov Johnson and through him I think he can get me releast, he wrote (Rock Island, Barracks 25, April 12, 1864). His family was unable to coordinate his release because they were no longer accepting applications. Colquitt wa

Auction archive: Lot number 98
Auction:
Datum:
17 Aug 2017
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
info@cowans.com
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
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