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Auction archive: Lot number 449

EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Raymond A. Hare, Princeton, New Jersey, 26 September 1946. 1 page, 4to, on Institute for Advanced Study stationery .

Auction 14.06.2006
14 Jun 2006
Estimate
US$1,800 - US$2,500
Price realised:
US$3,840
Auction archive: Lot number 449

EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Raymond A. Hare, Princeton, New Jersey, 26 September 1946. 1 page, 4to, on Institute for Advanced Study stationery .

Auction 14.06.2006
14 Jun 2006
Estimate
US$1,800 - US$2,500
Price realised:
US$3,840
Beschreibung:

EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Raymond A. Hare, Princeton, New Jersey, 26 September 1946. 1 page, 4to, on Institute for Advanced Study stationery . EINSTEIN PLEADS FOR A VISA TO REUNITE A CHILD WITH HIS PARENTS, TWO HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS WHO "SUFFERED GREATLY UNDER THE NAZI REGIME." "I am taking the liberty to address this letter to you," Einstein writes to Hare, the American Consul in London, "in behalf of Willy Ehrlich who has applied for an immigration visa to the United States. I know the parents of the young man, Richard and Sophie Ehrlich, to be people of excellent character who have suffered greatly under the Nazi regime: both were interned in the infamous concentration--camp Tereczin. They have been separated from their only child for eight years. It would very much gratify me if this family could be reunited as soon as possible. From the information I have about Willy Ehrlich I gather that the young man will be a useful citizen of this country." Richard Ehrlich wrote two unpublished accounts of his wartime experiences, "Our Negative Migration" (in the Leo Baeck Institute collection) and Erinnerungen. An meinen geliebten Sohn Willy Ehrlich in England, November 1943-July 1945 (Memoir: Addressed to my beloved son Willy Ehrlich in England), Wiener Library, London. The Ehrlichs were among the lucky few to survive Tereczin (or Theriesenstadt), a concentration camp housed in an old Czech fortress town. The Nazis expelled the 7,000 Czech inhabitants in 1942 and placed over 50,000 Jews there, mainly from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Denmark. It also became a transit camp for Jews being transported to Auschwitz. In all about 144,000 Jews were interned in Theriesenstadt. Some 88,000 were eventually sent to Auschwitz, another 33,000 died in the camp from starvation or typhus, while only 19,000 survived. Einstein used his name and prestige generously on behalf of such refugees. However the governments to which he appealed were not always so generous in response.

Auction archive: Lot number 449
Auction:
Datum:
14 Jun 2006
Auction house:
Christie's
14 June 2006, New York, Rockefeller Center
Beschreibung:

EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Raymond A. Hare, Princeton, New Jersey, 26 September 1946. 1 page, 4to, on Institute for Advanced Study stationery . EINSTEIN PLEADS FOR A VISA TO REUNITE A CHILD WITH HIS PARENTS, TWO HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS WHO "SUFFERED GREATLY UNDER THE NAZI REGIME." "I am taking the liberty to address this letter to you," Einstein writes to Hare, the American Consul in London, "in behalf of Willy Ehrlich who has applied for an immigration visa to the United States. I know the parents of the young man, Richard and Sophie Ehrlich, to be people of excellent character who have suffered greatly under the Nazi regime: both were interned in the infamous concentration--camp Tereczin. They have been separated from their only child for eight years. It would very much gratify me if this family could be reunited as soon as possible. From the information I have about Willy Ehrlich I gather that the young man will be a useful citizen of this country." Richard Ehrlich wrote two unpublished accounts of his wartime experiences, "Our Negative Migration" (in the Leo Baeck Institute collection) and Erinnerungen. An meinen geliebten Sohn Willy Ehrlich in England, November 1943-July 1945 (Memoir: Addressed to my beloved son Willy Ehrlich in England), Wiener Library, London. The Ehrlichs were among the lucky few to survive Tereczin (or Theriesenstadt), a concentration camp housed in an old Czech fortress town. The Nazis expelled the 7,000 Czech inhabitants in 1942 and placed over 50,000 Jews there, mainly from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Denmark. It also became a transit camp for Jews being transported to Auschwitz. In all about 144,000 Jews were interned in Theriesenstadt. Some 88,000 were eventually sent to Auschwitz, another 33,000 died in the camp from starvation or typhus, while only 19,000 survived. Einstein used his name and prestige generously on behalf of such refugees. However the governments to which he appealed were not always so generous in response.

Auction archive: Lot number 449
Auction:
Datum:
14 Jun 2006
Auction house:
Christie's
14 June 2006, New York, Rockefeller Center
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