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Auction archive: Lot number 134

Ex-Alton Walker, M.G.M. Studios 'Excuse my Dust' 1901 De Dion Bouton 5hp Motorette Chassis no. 128 Engine no. 5222

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$191,400
Auction archive: Lot number 134

Ex-Alton Walker, M.G.M. Studios 'Excuse my Dust' 1901 De Dion Bouton 5hp Motorette Chassis no. 128 Engine no. 5222

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$191,400
Beschreibung:

700cc F-Head Single-Cylinder Engine Single De Dion Carburetor 5bhp 2-Speed Epicyclic (Planetary) Transmission Front Semi-Elliptic Leaf Springs with Transverse Leaf Spring, De Dion Rear Axle with ¾ Elliptic Leaf Springs Inboard and Outboard Rear Wheel Brakes *Formerly owned by Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Founding Chairman Alton Walker *Ex-MGM Studios – featured in the Red Skelton Movie 'Excuse my Dust' *2012 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance 2nd in Class *Former cover car for Antique Automobile Club of America and Horseless Carriage Club of America publications *Right hand tiller steering De Dion Bouton in America The European car industry was steaming along by the turn of the 20th century. Like internet 'start-ups', thousands of individuals turned any aspect of their business to focus on the lucrative potential that the automobile offered. Whether searching for a foot-hold in the market or pioneering different ideas to theories that were fast becoming the norm, more established manufacturers looked for growth markets for their increasingly reliable products. One market that proved to have the largest barrier to entry was the market here in the US, owing to the large fees that were sanctioned on imported automobiles. But it was not only those east of the Atlantic that searched for solutions to being priced out of the American market; enterprising Americans recognized that the Selden patent situation, among other reasons, had put them on the back foot as far as the automobile was concerned. A number of Americans, impressed by the quality and performance of the European Mercedes, Benz, Panhards and the like looked for ways to commercially market them at home. The solution invariably came through licensing to build an American equivalent of the coveted European brand here in the U.S. Some of the cars would be imported and assembled here, others seemingly built the majority of the product here. By 1901 De Dion Bouton was one of the largest volume manufacturers of automobiles, nearing 20 years since Count Albert De Dion had commissioned Georges Bouton and Charles Trepardoux, brothers-in-law and jobbing engineers, to build light steam carriages for him. Latterly they had turned their attention from steam power to the internal combustion engine, first attaching them to tricycles and quadricyles before marketing a full-fledged voiturette or small automobile in 1899. Owing to its center facing seating arrangement for its passengers, the voiturette quickly became known as the 'vis-à-vis' a name which has stuck to this day. A light four wheeled automobile with a high-revving single cylinder motor of roughly 3 ½ horsepower, these machines were good for 20-25 mph. Tucked at the back of the voiturette was an invention that would ensure De Dion's relevance to this day, being the way in which the power from the motor was transferred to the road through 'universal' type joints with cardan shafts. This would allow constant drive to the rear wheels, while the engine and gearbox sat rigidly in the chassis frame. It enabled the car more versatility in the terrain that it covered and provided enhanced driver comfort. Naturally, as the financier rather than the engineer, this was not actually De Dion's device. It is generally attributed to Trepardoux who had already by then parted company with the organization, now named De Dion Bouton. Kenneth Skinner was the enterprising man behind the inevitable marketing of a De Dion Bouton-inspired product in America. Sensibly he translated the french 'voiture' as motor and marketed the cars as 'Motorettes'. Close inspection of the cars today reveals that with this particular venture a very large percentage of the car was built here, many of the parts being cast with 'NY' next to their part numbers and most of the aluminum castings have 'Motorette' cast into them. Built on Church Street in Brooklyn and sold in Manhattan on West 66th, sadly, the home appetite was not as strong as that in Europe, and the compa

Auction archive: Lot number 134
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
Beschreibung:

700cc F-Head Single-Cylinder Engine Single De Dion Carburetor 5bhp 2-Speed Epicyclic (Planetary) Transmission Front Semi-Elliptic Leaf Springs with Transverse Leaf Spring, De Dion Rear Axle with ¾ Elliptic Leaf Springs Inboard and Outboard Rear Wheel Brakes *Formerly owned by Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Founding Chairman Alton Walker *Ex-MGM Studios – featured in the Red Skelton Movie 'Excuse my Dust' *2012 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance 2nd in Class *Former cover car for Antique Automobile Club of America and Horseless Carriage Club of America publications *Right hand tiller steering De Dion Bouton in America The European car industry was steaming along by the turn of the 20th century. Like internet 'start-ups', thousands of individuals turned any aspect of their business to focus on the lucrative potential that the automobile offered. Whether searching for a foot-hold in the market or pioneering different ideas to theories that were fast becoming the norm, more established manufacturers looked for growth markets for their increasingly reliable products. One market that proved to have the largest barrier to entry was the market here in the US, owing to the large fees that were sanctioned on imported automobiles. But it was not only those east of the Atlantic that searched for solutions to being priced out of the American market; enterprising Americans recognized that the Selden patent situation, among other reasons, had put them on the back foot as far as the automobile was concerned. A number of Americans, impressed by the quality and performance of the European Mercedes, Benz, Panhards and the like looked for ways to commercially market them at home. The solution invariably came through licensing to build an American equivalent of the coveted European brand here in the U.S. Some of the cars would be imported and assembled here, others seemingly built the majority of the product here. By 1901 De Dion Bouton was one of the largest volume manufacturers of automobiles, nearing 20 years since Count Albert De Dion had commissioned Georges Bouton and Charles Trepardoux, brothers-in-law and jobbing engineers, to build light steam carriages for him. Latterly they had turned their attention from steam power to the internal combustion engine, first attaching them to tricycles and quadricyles before marketing a full-fledged voiturette or small automobile in 1899. Owing to its center facing seating arrangement for its passengers, the voiturette quickly became known as the 'vis-à-vis' a name which has stuck to this day. A light four wheeled automobile with a high-revving single cylinder motor of roughly 3 ½ horsepower, these machines were good for 20-25 mph. Tucked at the back of the voiturette was an invention that would ensure De Dion's relevance to this day, being the way in which the power from the motor was transferred to the road through 'universal' type joints with cardan shafts. This would allow constant drive to the rear wheels, while the engine and gearbox sat rigidly in the chassis frame. It enabled the car more versatility in the terrain that it covered and provided enhanced driver comfort. Naturally, as the financier rather than the engineer, this was not actually De Dion's device. It is generally attributed to Trepardoux who had already by then parted company with the organization, now named De Dion Bouton. Kenneth Skinner was the enterprising man behind the inevitable marketing of a De Dion Bouton-inspired product in America. Sensibly he translated the french 'voiture' as motor and marketed the cars as 'Motorettes'. Close inspection of the cars today reveals that with this particular venture a very large percentage of the car was built here, many of the parts being cast with 'NY' next to their part numbers and most of the aluminum castings have 'Motorette' cast into them. Built on Church Street in Brooklyn and sold in Manhattan on West 66th, sadly, the home appetite was not as strong as that in Europe, and the compa

Auction archive: Lot number 134
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
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