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Auction archive: Lot number 839

Hermann Ottomar Herzog, (German/American, 1832-1932), "Sunset on a Florida Marshland with Cattle Grazing", 1898, oil on canvas, 20-1...

Estimate
US$20,000 - US$40,000
Price realised:
n. a.
Auction archive: Lot number 839

Hermann Ottomar Herzog, (German/American, 1832-1932), "Sunset on a Florida Marshland with Cattle Grazing", 1898, oil on canvas, 20-1...

Estimate
US$20,000 - US$40,000
Price realised:
n. a.
Beschreibung:

Hermann Ottomar Herzog (German/American, 1832-1932) "Sunset on a Florida Marshland with Cattle Grazing", 1898 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right, frame and stretcher with three partial turn-of-the-century labels, all mostly effaced with one exhibition label with artist's name. Framed. 20-1/4" x 30-1/4", framed 29-1/2" x 39-3/4" Notes: Hermann Herzog's epic landscapes, accentuated by dramatic lighting, captivated the imagination of 19th- and 20th-century collectors, because the artist depicted the rugged Alps and the American wilderness through the rosy-tinted lens of "romantic pantheism." For Herzog, the landscape was a sublime experience; it was a reflection of God's creation that simultaneously awed and terrified people, and it was a medium for spiritual transcendence that both sanctioned and abated manifest destiny. In the early 1870s after Herzog immigrated to the United States, his views of the unchartered West provided an escapist reprieve from the war-torn East; in the early 1900s, his ethereal tonalist views of central Florida's flora and fauna bore significant historical and visual evidence of one of America's last frontiers. As this painting demonstrates, Florida is far more than everglades, beaches, sunset boulevards and iconic palm trees; it has the longest history of ranching in any state of the United States. Cattle ranching, followed by logging, was the economic staple at the turn of the 20th century. Florida was the nation's leading cattle exporter not only within the eastern United States, but also within the Caribbean, fostering a lucrative market with Key West, Cuba and Nassau. Cattle ranches flourished throughout north central Florida between Tampa, where Herzog's son Herman Jr. lived and Gainesville, and Herzog (through the few titled Florida works) is known to have painted this region along the inlets and waterways of the Alachua and Waccasassa Rivers, which are in close proximity to Silver Springs resort, a major tourist destination and artist colony on the Ocklawaha River that rivaled St. Augustine. The vast flatness, the reflective marsh, the low horizon, and immense sky that engulfs more than half the picture plane in a haze of gold and pink is distinctly Floridian, according to curator Gary Libby. In Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965, the exhibition catalogue from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown (the largest known private collection of Florida-based art), Libby writes that the key to "finding Floridaness" is a discerning eye for composition, flora, fauna and lighting. "Where the land is flat, waters move slowly," where shallow waters stagnate, humidity arises and causes the shorter rays of sunlight at sunset to naturally blur into an atmospheric perspective that only Herzog, an accomplished Barbizon/Hudson River School artist, could truly capture through the bravura of reverse lighting - where the landscape is ethereally lit from behind, casting the foreground into warm shadows. Nowhere is this stunning effect better visualized than in the silhouettes of the cattle, the ashen roiling clouds and the splayed trunks of the young cypress trees on the left horizon. True to all Florida swamp cypresses (Taxodium distichum), they moor support in wetlands by buttressing outward, before growing upward knees. This is Florida, and this is Herzog, a master of reverse and tonalist lighting, at his finest. As the Philadelphia Press lauded his work: "His faculty of choosing the most effective illumination. . . assisted by the rapidity of execution which enables him to seize and fetter the most transient phenomena of light and shade - of clouds that pass and of water - amount to genius and make his pictures unique among landscapes." References: State of Florida Photographic Archives. Florida Cattle Ranching. http://floridamemory.com. Accessed Nov. 15, 2017; Libby, Gary Russell. Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965, from the Collection of Cici and Wyatt Brown. Daytona: Museum of Arts
In overall good condition. The painting has some minute pinhead-sized losses due to the fine craquelure throughout. There are small scattered areas of inpainting to the lower third of the painting, mostly to the edges with some "retouching" to the far right cow. Inpainting along the lower right edge and corner has partly obfuscated the right side of the signature and date. As a result, the date may have been strengthened/over-painted. The upper right corner also has some minor inpainting. The sky is intact with no restoration detected under UV light. The painting exhibits surface soiling, which can be easily removed with cleaning. Condition and subsequent restoration are commensurate with age and medium. Please note that one of the labels en verso is of a later date, probably mid-20th century.

Auction archive: Lot number 839
Auction:
Datum:
9 Dec 2017
Auction house:
New Orleans Auction
333 Saint Joseph Street
New Orleans Lousiana 70130
United States
[email protected]
+ 1 (0)504 566 1849
+ 1 (0)504 566 1851
Beschreibung:

Hermann Ottomar Herzog (German/American, 1832-1932) "Sunset on a Florida Marshland with Cattle Grazing", 1898 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right, frame and stretcher with three partial turn-of-the-century labels, all mostly effaced with one exhibition label with artist's name. Framed. 20-1/4" x 30-1/4", framed 29-1/2" x 39-3/4" Notes: Hermann Herzog's epic landscapes, accentuated by dramatic lighting, captivated the imagination of 19th- and 20th-century collectors, because the artist depicted the rugged Alps and the American wilderness through the rosy-tinted lens of "romantic pantheism." For Herzog, the landscape was a sublime experience; it was a reflection of God's creation that simultaneously awed and terrified people, and it was a medium for spiritual transcendence that both sanctioned and abated manifest destiny. In the early 1870s after Herzog immigrated to the United States, his views of the unchartered West provided an escapist reprieve from the war-torn East; in the early 1900s, his ethereal tonalist views of central Florida's flora and fauna bore significant historical and visual evidence of one of America's last frontiers. As this painting demonstrates, Florida is far more than everglades, beaches, sunset boulevards and iconic palm trees; it has the longest history of ranching in any state of the United States. Cattle ranching, followed by logging, was the economic staple at the turn of the 20th century. Florida was the nation's leading cattle exporter not only within the eastern United States, but also within the Caribbean, fostering a lucrative market with Key West, Cuba and Nassau. Cattle ranches flourished throughout north central Florida between Tampa, where Herzog's son Herman Jr. lived and Gainesville, and Herzog (through the few titled Florida works) is known to have painted this region along the inlets and waterways of the Alachua and Waccasassa Rivers, which are in close proximity to Silver Springs resort, a major tourist destination and artist colony on the Ocklawaha River that rivaled St. Augustine. The vast flatness, the reflective marsh, the low horizon, and immense sky that engulfs more than half the picture plane in a haze of gold and pink is distinctly Floridian, according to curator Gary Libby. In Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965, the exhibition catalogue from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown (the largest known private collection of Florida-based art), Libby writes that the key to "finding Floridaness" is a discerning eye for composition, flora, fauna and lighting. "Where the land is flat, waters move slowly," where shallow waters stagnate, humidity arises and causes the shorter rays of sunlight at sunset to naturally blur into an atmospheric perspective that only Herzog, an accomplished Barbizon/Hudson River School artist, could truly capture through the bravura of reverse lighting - where the landscape is ethereally lit from behind, casting the foreground into warm shadows. Nowhere is this stunning effect better visualized than in the silhouettes of the cattle, the ashen roiling clouds and the splayed trunks of the young cypress trees on the left horizon. True to all Florida swamp cypresses (Taxodium distichum), they moor support in wetlands by buttressing outward, before growing upward knees. This is Florida, and this is Herzog, a master of reverse and tonalist lighting, at his finest. As the Philadelphia Press lauded his work: "His faculty of choosing the most effective illumination. . . assisted by the rapidity of execution which enables him to seize and fetter the most transient phenomena of light and shade - of clouds that pass and of water - amount to genius and make his pictures unique among landscapes." References: State of Florida Photographic Archives. Florida Cattle Ranching. http://floridamemory.com. Accessed Nov. 15, 2017; Libby, Gary Russell. Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965, from the Collection of Cici and Wyatt Brown. Daytona: Museum of Arts
In overall good condition. The painting has some minute pinhead-sized losses due to the fine craquelure throughout. There are small scattered areas of inpainting to the lower third of the painting, mostly to the edges with some "retouching" to the far right cow. Inpainting along the lower right edge and corner has partly obfuscated the right side of the signature and date. As a result, the date may have been strengthened/over-painted. The upper right corner also has some minor inpainting. The sky is intact with no restoration detected under UV light. The painting exhibits surface soiling, which can be easily removed with cleaning. Condition and subsequent restoration are commensurate with age and medium. Please note that one of the labels en verso is of a later date, probably mid-20th century.

Auction archive: Lot number 839
Auction:
Datum:
9 Dec 2017
Auction house:
New Orleans Auction
333 Saint Joseph Street
New Orleans Lousiana 70130
United States
[email protected]
+ 1 (0)504 566 1849
+ 1 (0)504 566 1851
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