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Auction archive: Lot number 231

LANGLAND, William (circa 1330-1400) (attributed to)] The vision of Pierce Plowman, newlye imprynted after the authors olde copy, with a brefe summary of the principall matters set before every part called Passus. Whereunto is also annexed the Crede o...

Auction 06.06.2001
6 Jun 2001
Estimate
£1,000 - £1,500
ca. US$1,401 - US$2,101
Price realised:
£1,410
ca. US$1,975
Auction archive: Lot number 231

LANGLAND, William (circa 1330-1400) (attributed to)] The vision of Pierce Plowman, newlye imprynted after the authors olde copy, with a brefe summary of the principall matters set before every part called Passus. Whereunto is also annexed the Crede o...

Auction 06.06.2001
6 Jun 2001
Estimate
£1,000 - £1,500
ca. US$1,401 - US$2,101
Price realised:
£1,410
ca. US$1,975
Beschreibung:

LANGLAND, William (circa 1330-1400) (attributed to)] The vision of Pierce Plowman, newlye imprynted after the authors olde copy, with a brefe summary of the principall matters set before every part called Passus. Whereunto is also annexed the Crede of pierce plowman, never imprynted with the booke before , London: Owen Rogers, [1561]. Small 4°, title with woodcut scrolling foliate ornament, woodcut initials (lacking Crede , some headlines shaved, paper flaw in margin of E4, browning to Hh1-4), 19th-century calf with single gilt fillet, flat spine, green lettering-piece (rebacked, lightly worn); early inscription on title and other annotations; bookplate of Earls of Cromer (by J. F. Badeley, dated 1912). Fourth edition. The attribution of this work to William Langland is based on internal evidence, "'I have lyved in lande,' quod I; 'my name is Long Wille '", and notes in early manuscript copies of the work. Langland appears to have hailed from the western Midlands, as is evinced by the numerous references to places and events associated with Shropshire, Herefordshire, the Malvern Hills, and Cheshire, and in his use of a vocabulary which survived in parts in Shropshire dialect into the 19th century. The Visions of Piers Plowman is held to be his finest work, and in addition to being a record of his extraordinary visions, it reveals Langland as a keen observer of contemporary events. In his choice of language Langland was part of the so-called 'Teutonic revival' in England, sometimes preferring unrhymed alliteration, an old English metre. The manuscript note on the title erronously states that 'the author of this booke was John Malverne fellow of Oriel Colledge who finisht this book in 1342'. Despite the claim of the title, this edition of the Vision seldom includes the unrelated Crede . STC 19908.

Auction archive: Lot number 231
Auction:
Datum:
6 Jun 2001
Auction house:
Christie's
London, South Kensington
Beschreibung:

LANGLAND, William (circa 1330-1400) (attributed to)] The vision of Pierce Plowman, newlye imprynted after the authors olde copy, with a brefe summary of the principall matters set before every part called Passus. Whereunto is also annexed the Crede of pierce plowman, never imprynted with the booke before , London: Owen Rogers, [1561]. Small 4°, title with woodcut scrolling foliate ornament, woodcut initials (lacking Crede , some headlines shaved, paper flaw in margin of E4, browning to Hh1-4), 19th-century calf with single gilt fillet, flat spine, green lettering-piece (rebacked, lightly worn); early inscription on title and other annotations; bookplate of Earls of Cromer (by J. F. Badeley, dated 1912). Fourth edition. The attribution of this work to William Langland is based on internal evidence, "'I have lyved in lande,' quod I; 'my name is Long Wille '", and notes in early manuscript copies of the work. Langland appears to have hailed from the western Midlands, as is evinced by the numerous references to places and events associated with Shropshire, Herefordshire, the Malvern Hills, and Cheshire, and in his use of a vocabulary which survived in parts in Shropshire dialect into the 19th century. The Visions of Piers Plowman is held to be his finest work, and in addition to being a record of his extraordinary visions, it reveals Langland as a keen observer of contemporary events. In his choice of language Langland was part of the so-called 'Teutonic revival' in England, sometimes preferring unrhymed alliteration, an old English metre. The manuscript note on the title erronously states that 'the author of this booke was John Malverne fellow of Oriel Colledge who finisht this book in 1342'. Despite the claim of the title, this edition of the Vision seldom includes the unrelated Crede . STC 19908.

Auction archive: Lot number 231
Auction:
Datum:
6 Jun 2001
Auction house:
Christie's
London, South Kensington
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