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Auction archive: Lot number 170

Lincoln Assassination Trial Admission Ticket, Signed D. Hunter with Signed Photo of Hunter

Estimate
US$700 - US$1,000
Price realised:
US$938
Auction archive: Lot number 170

Lincoln Assassination Trial Admission Ticket, Signed D. Hunter with Signed Photo of Hunter

Estimate
US$700 - US$1,000
Price realised:
US$938
Beschreibung:

Lot includes an unused ticket to the trial of the Lincoln conspirators with "D. Hunter" as President of the Military Commission. Also a cabinet card of an older (white-haired) Hunter in uniform (GAR?) with signature on verso. Card with photographer's identification of Rice, Washington, DC on both recto and verso. David Hunter (1802-1886) graduated from USMA in 1822 and was assigned to frontier service. During this time he seems to have developed strong anti-slavery views. While stationed at Fort Leavenworth about 1860 he began communicating with candidate Lincoln about slavery. Hunter was invited to ride the train with Lincoln as part of his security detail from Springfield to Washington to take the office of President. As the Civil War began Hunter was promoted to Colonel of the 6th US Cavalry. Shortly after he received a promotion to Brigadier General. Hunter was wounded in the cheek at the first Battle of Bull Run/Manassas. Shortly after this, he received the rank of Major General of Volunteers. In late 1861 he was serving under Fremont, taking command of the unit when Fremont was relieved of duty for attempting to emancipate enslaved people of rebels. In about two months, Hunter was re-assigned to Kansas, in an attempt to keep him out of trouble. His complaints to the President eventually got him transferred to the X Corps in the Department of the South. By late spring, Hunter was enlisting former enslaved people into the 1st South Carolina (Union). Although ordered by Washington to cease, he did not, and eventually Congress approved enlistment of African Americans. Hunter then issued emancipation orders (G.O. No. 11) to all enslaved people in his Department - South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. This emancipation order was rescinded by Lincoln, who, of course, issued his own emancipation orders in September 1862 (to take effect January 1863). After Lincoln's assassination Hunter accompanied the body back to Springfield and presided over the military trial of the conspirators. Condition: Very good to excellent overall.

Auction archive: Lot number 170
Auction:
Datum:
30 Jul 2020
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
Beschreibung:

Lot includes an unused ticket to the trial of the Lincoln conspirators with "D. Hunter" as President of the Military Commission. Also a cabinet card of an older (white-haired) Hunter in uniform (GAR?) with signature on verso. Card with photographer's identification of Rice, Washington, DC on both recto and verso. David Hunter (1802-1886) graduated from USMA in 1822 and was assigned to frontier service. During this time he seems to have developed strong anti-slavery views. While stationed at Fort Leavenworth about 1860 he began communicating with candidate Lincoln about slavery. Hunter was invited to ride the train with Lincoln as part of his security detail from Springfield to Washington to take the office of President. As the Civil War began Hunter was promoted to Colonel of the 6th US Cavalry. Shortly after he received a promotion to Brigadier General. Hunter was wounded in the cheek at the first Battle of Bull Run/Manassas. Shortly after this, he received the rank of Major General of Volunteers. In late 1861 he was serving under Fremont, taking command of the unit when Fremont was relieved of duty for attempting to emancipate enslaved people of rebels. In about two months, Hunter was re-assigned to Kansas, in an attempt to keep him out of trouble. His complaints to the President eventually got him transferred to the X Corps in the Department of the South. By late spring, Hunter was enlisting former enslaved people into the 1st South Carolina (Union). Although ordered by Washington to cease, he did not, and eventually Congress approved enlistment of African Americans. Hunter then issued emancipation orders (G.O. No. 11) to all enslaved people in his Department - South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. This emancipation order was rescinded by Lincoln, who, of course, issued his own emancipation orders in September 1862 (to take effect January 1863). After Lincoln's assassination Hunter accompanied the body back to Springfield and presided over the military trial of the conspirators. Condition: Very good to excellent overall.

Auction archive: Lot number 170
Auction:
Datum:
30 Jul 2020
Auction house:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
United States
[email protected]
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
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