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Auction archive: Lot number 808

The C.B., C.B.E. group of seven

Estimate
£240 - £280
ca. US$293 - US$342
Price realised:
£700
ca. US$855
Auction archive: Lot number 808

The C.B., C.B.E. group of seven

Estimate
£240 - £280
ca. US$293 - US$342
Price realised:
£700
ca. US$855
Beschreibung:

The C.B., C.B.E. group of seven miniature dress medals attributed to Brigadier-General M. O. Little, 9th Lancers The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, C.B. (Military) Companion’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with integral gold riband buckle; The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, C.B.E. (Military) Commander’s 1st type badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Afghanistan 1878-80, 2 clasps, Kabul, Kandahar; Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, 7 clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen; King’s South Africa 1901-02, 1 clasp, South Africa 1902; Delhi Durbar 1903, silver, with integral top riband buckle, the silver medals ‘dipped’, generally very fine and better (7) £240-£280 Footnote C.B. London Gazette 24 June 1904. C.B.E. London Gazette 3 June 1919: ‘For valuable service rendered in connection with the War.’ Malcolm Orme Little was born in London on 29 November, 1857 the second son of General Sir Archibald Little, K.C.B. He was initially commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Royal North Gloucester Militia in September 1877, and then obtained his first regular commission with the 17th Lancers in 1878, having passed out of the Royal Military College where he had been an Honorary Queen’s Cadet. Later that year he transferred into the 9th Lancers (his father’s regiment) as Lieutenant travelled to India to serve in the Afghan War of 1878-80, where he was Orderly Officer to Brigadier-General Hugh Gough V.C. C.B. He was present during the march from Kabul to Kandahar and the battle which followed, and for this he was Mentioned in Despatches. A keen polo player, he took part in the 1886 International Polo Cup and was part of the winning team alongside John Henry Watson, Captain Thomas Hone, and Captain the Hon. Richard Lawley, 4th Baron Wenlock. He was considered ‘a great popular favourite and a more dashing forward never carried a polo stick’ (‘Polo, Past and Present’ by Dale refers). He was also a member of the teams which won the Inter-regimental tournaments of 1885,1889 and 1890 amongst others. Little came to full prominence during the Boer War and his name was famously featured in Colonel Frank Rhode’s cryptic message to the defenders of Mafeking, as once the Mafeking Relief Column approached the town they sent a message to Baden-Powell to forewarn him about their strength. Little’s name featured in the code which Rhodes chose to encrypt his message should it have been intercepted by the Boers. As recorded in ‘The Times History’ this rather ‘Boy’s Own’ episode entered Mafeking folklore soon after: ‘At Baden-Powell’s request Mahon sent him an account of the numbers of his force, his guns, and the state of his supplies in the following enigmatic form, as he had no cypher: “Our numbers are the address of the Naval and Military Club multiplied by ten [94 (Piccadilly) x 10 = 940]; our guns, the number of sons in the Ward family [6]; our supplies, the Officer Commanding the 9th Lancers [Little].” As the 9th Lancers sailed for South Africa in September 1899, their Commanding Officer Colonel Bloomfield Gough was on sick leave in England and Little, as Second-in-Command, was temporarily placed in command until Gough returned to full health Little’s skill as a cavalry officer was noted early on during the campaign, when following a reconnaissance before the Battle of Modder River, he informed Lord Methuen that the Boers were present in greater strength than previously assumed. On this occasion Methuen chose to ignore Little’s report and sent his troops directly into the ambush at the river bank, but Little showed sufficient initiative with his troops to create a diversion and avoid a rout. The Times History again records that during the Battle of Modder River: ‘At one time during the morning the Boer guns brought a most effective fire to bear on a white house and kraal, a mile above Bosman’s Drift, in which a company of mounted infantry had ensconced

Auction archive: Lot number 808
Auction:
Datum:
21 May 2020
Auction house:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
United Kingdom
auctions@dnw.co.uk
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
Beschreibung:

The C.B., C.B.E. group of seven miniature dress medals attributed to Brigadier-General M. O. Little, 9th Lancers The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, C.B. (Military) Companion’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with integral gold riband buckle; The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, C.B.E. (Military) Commander’s 1st type badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Afghanistan 1878-80, 2 clasps, Kabul, Kandahar; Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, 7 clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen; King’s South Africa 1901-02, 1 clasp, South Africa 1902; Delhi Durbar 1903, silver, with integral top riband buckle, the silver medals ‘dipped’, generally very fine and better (7) £240-£280 Footnote C.B. London Gazette 24 June 1904. C.B.E. London Gazette 3 June 1919: ‘For valuable service rendered in connection with the War.’ Malcolm Orme Little was born in London on 29 November, 1857 the second son of General Sir Archibald Little, K.C.B. He was initially commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Royal North Gloucester Militia in September 1877, and then obtained his first regular commission with the 17th Lancers in 1878, having passed out of the Royal Military College where he had been an Honorary Queen’s Cadet. Later that year he transferred into the 9th Lancers (his father’s regiment) as Lieutenant travelled to India to serve in the Afghan War of 1878-80, where he was Orderly Officer to Brigadier-General Hugh Gough V.C. C.B. He was present during the march from Kabul to Kandahar and the battle which followed, and for this he was Mentioned in Despatches. A keen polo player, he took part in the 1886 International Polo Cup and was part of the winning team alongside John Henry Watson, Captain Thomas Hone, and Captain the Hon. Richard Lawley, 4th Baron Wenlock. He was considered ‘a great popular favourite and a more dashing forward never carried a polo stick’ (‘Polo, Past and Present’ by Dale refers). He was also a member of the teams which won the Inter-regimental tournaments of 1885,1889 and 1890 amongst others. Little came to full prominence during the Boer War and his name was famously featured in Colonel Frank Rhode’s cryptic message to the defenders of Mafeking, as once the Mafeking Relief Column approached the town they sent a message to Baden-Powell to forewarn him about their strength. Little’s name featured in the code which Rhodes chose to encrypt his message should it have been intercepted by the Boers. As recorded in ‘The Times History’ this rather ‘Boy’s Own’ episode entered Mafeking folklore soon after: ‘At Baden-Powell’s request Mahon sent him an account of the numbers of his force, his guns, and the state of his supplies in the following enigmatic form, as he had no cypher: “Our numbers are the address of the Naval and Military Club multiplied by ten [94 (Piccadilly) x 10 = 940]; our guns, the number of sons in the Ward family [6]; our supplies, the Officer Commanding the 9th Lancers [Little].” As the 9th Lancers sailed for South Africa in September 1899, their Commanding Officer Colonel Bloomfield Gough was on sick leave in England and Little, as Second-in-Command, was temporarily placed in command until Gough returned to full health Little’s skill as a cavalry officer was noted early on during the campaign, when following a reconnaissance before the Battle of Modder River, he informed Lord Methuen that the Boers were present in greater strength than previously assumed. On this occasion Methuen chose to ignore Little’s report and sent his troops directly into the ambush at the river bank, but Little showed sufficient initiative with his troops to create a diversion and avoid a rout. The Times History again records that during the Battle of Modder River: ‘At one time during the morning the Boer guns brought a most effective fire to bear on a white house and kraal, a mile above Bosman’s Drift, in which a company of mounted infantry had ensconced

Auction archive: Lot number 808
Auction:
Datum:
21 May 2020
Auction house:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
United Kingdom
auctions@dnw.co.uk
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
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