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Auction archive: Lot number 14

The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677

Estimate
US$60,000 - US$80,000
Price realised:
n. a.
Auction archive: Lot number 14

The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677

Estimate
US$60,000 - US$80,000
Price realised:
n. a.
Beschreibung:

The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677 William Hubbard 1677 HUBBARD, William (1621-1704). The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677. London: for Thomas Parkhurst 1677. Ternaux-Compans copy of the first English edition of an important contemporary narrative of King Philip's War, the deadliest conflict of the Colonial era, with the very rare "Wine Hills" map. The present edition, issued only three months after the Boston edition, corrects many of the earlier's typographical errors (only the 12-line Errata is not reprinted). The map is oriented to the south and depicts New England settlements in three colonies, from New Haven, CT to Pemaquid, ME and as far inland as Deerfield and the White Hills. It was re-cut in London from the Boston version, with the White Hills mis-transcribed as the Wine Hills. "For nearly half a century after the Pequot War, the English and Native Americans of New England found ways to avoid military conflict. As the population of New England's Puritan communities increased, however, so too did their disputes with the region's Indian leaders." (Creating America). King Philip's War, also called the First Indian War, was a conflict between English colonists and the Wampanoag during the years 1675-1678. While the colonists had enjoyed positive relations with Ousamequin, the previous sachem of the Wampanoag, the their repeated encroachments led to war under his son Metacom, called King Philip by the English, and his ally and sister-in-law Weetamoo. The conflict was a major turning point in the history of Colonial identity in New England, altering the trajectory of their relationship with both their mother country and the Native population of Massachusetts. Hubbard's narrative minimizes the actions of the English settlers and their role in the conflict, instead casting the Wampanoag as brutal enemies set on revenge killing over minor faux pas. Hubbard, along with the accounts of Increase Mather and John Cotton, colored the understanding of the conflict for centuries following, making it into a parable of the inevitability of English dominion in North America. Creating America 142; Howes H756 ("d"); Sabin 33446; Streeter sale 641. See Lisa Brooks, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War (2018). Quarto (195 x 138mm). License leaf present; title printed within double rule; woodcut folding “Wine Hills” map; two woodcut initials (tiny tear at corner fold and short closed stub tear to map; light browning and spotting). 19th-century calf backed boards with gilt stamp and monogram of Henri Ternaux-Compans (rebacked with portion of original spine and gilt title preserved). Provenance: "Dan Newcomb" (signature on title) – Henri Ternaux-Compans (1807-1864; supralibros).

Auction archive: Lot number 14
Auction:
Datum:
25 May 2022
Auction house:
Christie's
King Street, St. James's 8
London, SW1Y 6QT
United Kingdom
+44 (0)20 7839 9060
+44 (0)20 73892869
Beschreibung:

The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677 William Hubbard 1677 HUBBARD, William (1621-1704). The Present State of New-England. Being a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New-England, from the first planting thereof in the year 1607, to this present year 1677. London: for Thomas Parkhurst 1677. Ternaux-Compans copy of the first English edition of an important contemporary narrative of King Philip's War, the deadliest conflict of the Colonial era, with the very rare "Wine Hills" map. The present edition, issued only three months after the Boston edition, corrects many of the earlier's typographical errors (only the 12-line Errata is not reprinted). The map is oriented to the south and depicts New England settlements in three colonies, from New Haven, CT to Pemaquid, ME and as far inland as Deerfield and the White Hills. It was re-cut in London from the Boston version, with the White Hills mis-transcribed as the Wine Hills. "For nearly half a century after the Pequot War, the English and Native Americans of New England found ways to avoid military conflict. As the population of New England's Puritan communities increased, however, so too did their disputes with the region's Indian leaders." (Creating America). King Philip's War, also called the First Indian War, was a conflict between English colonists and the Wampanoag during the years 1675-1678. While the colonists had enjoyed positive relations with Ousamequin, the previous sachem of the Wampanoag, the their repeated encroachments led to war under his son Metacom, called King Philip by the English, and his ally and sister-in-law Weetamoo. The conflict was a major turning point in the history of Colonial identity in New England, altering the trajectory of their relationship with both their mother country and the Native population of Massachusetts. Hubbard's narrative minimizes the actions of the English settlers and their role in the conflict, instead casting the Wampanoag as brutal enemies set on revenge killing over minor faux pas. Hubbard, along with the accounts of Increase Mather and John Cotton, colored the understanding of the conflict for centuries following, making it into a parable of the inevitability of English dominion in North America. Creating America 142; Howes H756 ("d"); Sabin 33446; Streeter sale 641. See Lisa Brooks, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War (2018). Quarto (195 x 138mm). License leaf present; title printed within double rule; woodcut folding “Wine Hills” map; two woodcut initials (tiny tear at corner fold and short closed stub tear to map; light browning and spotting). 19th-century calf backed boards with gilt stamp and monogram of Henri Ternaux-Compans (rebacked with portion of original spine and gilt title preserved). Provenance: "Dan Newcomb" (signature on title) – Henri Ternaux-Compans (1807-1864; supralibros).

Auction archive: Lot number 14
Auction:
Datum:
25 May 2022
Auction house:
Christie's
King Street, St. James's 8
London, SW1Y 6QT
United Kingdom
+44 (0)20 7839 9060
+44 (0)20 73892869
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