Premium pages left without account:

Auction archive: Lot number 242

WHARTON, Edith (1862-1937). Long series of 92 autograph letters signed, and one letter signed to Marie Lee-Childe (two to her husband, Edward Lee-Childe), The Mount, Lenox, Massachusetts; 53 rue de Varennes, Paris; Hotel Costebelle, Hyres; Sainte-Cla...

Auction 29.11.1999
29 Nov 1999
Estimate
£10,000 - £15,000
ca. US$16,228 - US$24,342
Price realised:
£10,350
ca. US$16,796
Auction archive: Lot number 242

WHARTON, Edith (1862-1937). Long series of 92 autograph letters signed, and one letter signed to Marie Lee-Childe (two to her husband, Edward Lee-Childe), The Mount, Lenox, Massachusetts; 53 rue de Varennes, Paris; Hotel Costebelle, Hyres; Sainte-Cla...

Auction 29.11.1999
29 Nov 1999
Estimate
£10,000 - £15,000
ca. US$16,228 - US$24,342
Price realised:
£10,350
ca. US$16,796
Beschreibung:

WHARTON, Edith (1862-1937). Long series of 92 autograph letters signed, and one letter signed to Marie Lee-Childe (two to her husband, Edward Lee Childe), The Mount, Lenox, Massachusetts; 53 rue de Varennes, Paris; Hotel Costebelle, Hyres; Sainte-Claire du Cateau, Hyres; Pavillon Colombe, Saint-Brice-sous-Fort; I Tatti, Settignano; and elsewhere, c. 1908-1934, approximately 240 pages, 4to and 8vo (one torn along centre fold, one written in pencil); together with 30 envelopes; also 28 autograph cards and pictorial postcards (three of which depict interiors of her house at Hyres), two autograph notes, one typed letter signed accompanying a copy of a letter by General Pershing to Wharton regarding her refugee work (1917), retained copy of letter by Marie Lee-Childe to Wharton regarding the generous references in the latter's autobiography A Backward Glance (1934) and autograph letter and letter signed by Wharton's executrix, Elisina Royall Tyler relating to Wharton's last weeks and death (1937). Provenance . Marie Lee-Childe; and by descent. One of the earliest letters is an invitation to take tea 'with Mr James and me'. By 1912 when Wharton returned to Paris from Spain the letters are notably warm in tone and are signed for a time 'Yours affly Pussy'. But the close friendship between Wharton and Lee-Childe was established during the First World War when the letters chronicle Wharton's efforts to assist the flood of refugees from Belgium and Northern France which began to arrive in Paris in late 1914. Wharton and her friends including Lee-Childe established the American Hostels for Refugees, setting up committees (on which Lee-Childe served) to run the hostels and provide the women with paid work. Wharton discusses the arrangements and such details as the need to make sewing obligatory. A constant theme in these years is lack of money ('I hope to have a concert ... for we need thousands & thousands of francs. We ought to be able to hire a big building for the worst cases among the women and children'). In early 1915 Wharton organised the Children of Flanders Rescue Committee which opened five houses in or near Paris, again ably supported by Lee-Childe. Wharton writes, 'We now have 600 refugees to care for, & what with the American Hostels & my ouvrier [sewing group] ... I have been simply distracted'. In 1916 Wharton describes the two villas the Committee had hired with gardens at Arromanches for 'a lot of sickly children from the Hostels'. Lee-Childe was a generous sponsor of these charities in cash and kind, Wharton writing to her in 1917 'What a splendid offer to sell your Pekinese for the fund ... I will ... put his photo in the Herald, & I daresay we may get even higher bids for him than 1000 fcs!'. Wharton describes the monetary gifts she had received from Roosevelt and the Lafayette Heroes' Fund and sends a copy of the letter (enclosed) from General Pershing commending her work 'You ... have made Americans very proud of the record of their fellow-country-woman'. There are personal references in the earlier letters to the death of her mother-in-law and her husband's reaction, to the loss of her cousin Newbold Rhindelander in the war, to her visit to Bernard Berenson at I Tatti, to her friend Robert Norton whom she descrtibes as 'very charming', asking Lee-Childe if she can bring him to stay. After the war she writes from Hyres, 'I am very happy to be here, in this quiet corner, & Mr Norton is in a state of bliss, after 2 years of London Admiralty work without a holiday!' Later their correspondence concerns ideas for gardens and the pekinese including Wharton's companion of fifteen years, 'the shameless Chumai'. Marie Lee-Childe (the widow of Edward Lee Childe, the friend of Henry James see lot 222) lived at the Chateau Le Perthuis, Conflans-sur-Loing. The correspondence is apparently unrecorded by Wharton's biographers. (112)

Auction archive: Lot number 242
Auction:
Datum:
29 Nov 1999
Auction house:
Christie's
London, King Street
Beschreibung:

WHARTON, Edith (1862-1937). Long series of 92 autograph letters signed, and one letter signed to Marie Lee-Childe (two to her husband, Edward Lee Childe), The Mount, Lenox, Massachusetts; 53 rue de Varennes, Paris; Hotel Costebelle, Hyres; Sainte-Claire du Cateau, Hyres; Pavillon Colombe, Saint-Brice-sous-Fort; I Tatti, Settignano; and elsewhere, c. 1908-1934, approximately 240 pages, 4to and 8vo (one torn along centre fold, one written in pencil); together with 30 envelopes; also 28 autograph cards and pictorial postcards (three of which depict interiors of her house at Hyres), two autograph notes, one typed letter signed accompanying a copy of a letter by General Pershing to Wharton regarding her refugee work (1917), retained copy of letter by Marie Lee-Childe to Wharton regarding the generous references in the latter's autobiography A Backward Glance (1934) and autograph letter and letter signed by Wharton's executrix, Elisina Royall Tyler relating to Wharton's last weeks and death (1937). Provenance . Marie Lee-Childe; and by descent. One of the earliest letters is an invitation to take tea 'with Mr James and me'. By 1912 when Wharton returned to Paris from Spain the letters are notably warm in tone and are signed for a time 'Yours affly Pussy'. But the close friendship between Wharton and Lee-Childe was established during the First World War when the letters chronicle Wharton's efforts to assist the flood of refugees from Belgium and Northern France which began to arrive in Paris in late 1914. Wharton and her friends including Lee-Childe established the American Hostels for Refugees, setting up committees (on which Lee-Childe served) to run the hostels and provide the women with paid work. Wharton discusses the arrangements and such details as the need to make sewing obligatory. A constant theme in these years is lack of money ('I hope to have a concert ... for we need thousands & thousands of francs. We ought to be able to hire a big building for the worst cases among the women and children'). In early 1915 Wharton organised the Children of Flanders Rescue Committee which opened five houses in or near Paris, again ably supported by Lee-Childe. Wharton writes, 'We now have 600 refugees to care for, & what with the American Hostels & my ouvrier [sewing group] ... I have been simply distracted'. In 1916 Wharton describes the two villas the Committee had hired with gardens at Arromanches for 'a lot of sickly children from the Hostels'. Lee-Childe was a generous sponsor of these charities in cash and kind, Wharton writing to her in 1917 'What a splendid offer to sell your Pekinese for the fund ... I will ... put his photo in the Herald, & I daresay we may get even higher bids for him than 1000 fcs!'. Wharton describes the monetary gifts she had received from Roosevelt and the Lafayette Heroes' Fund and sends a copy of the letter (enclosed) from General Pershing commending her work 'You ... have made Americans very proud of the record of their fellow-country-woman'. There are personal references in the earlier letters to the death of her mother-in-law and her husband's reaction, to the loss of her cousin Newbold Rhindelander in the war, to her visit to Bernard Berenson at I Tatti, to her friend Robert Norton whom she descrtibes as 'very charming', asking Lee-Childe if she can bring him to stay. After the war she writes from Hyres, 'I am very happy to be here, in this quiet corner, & Mr Norton is in a state of bliss, after 2 years of London Admiralty work without a holiday!' Later their correspondence concerns ideas for gardens and the pekinese including Wharton's companion of fifteen years, 'the shameless Chumai'. Marie Lee-Childe (the widow of Edward Lee Childe, the friend of Henry James see lot 222) lived at the Chateau Le Perthuis, Conflans-sur-Loing. The correspondence is apparently unrecorded by Wharton's biographers. (112)

Auction archive: Lot number 242
Auction:
Datum:
29 Nov 1999
Auction house:
Christie's
London, King Street
Try LotSearch

Try LotSearch and its premium features for 7 days - without any costs!

  • Search lots and bid
  • Price database and artist analysis
  • Alerts for your searches
Create an alert now!

Be notified automatically about new items in upcoming auctions.

Create an alert