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Auction archive: Lot number 141

'767 KNX' - The ex-Works, Sebring 12-Hours, Targa Florio 1964 Austin-Healey 3000 MkII Lightweight Chassis no. HBJ7-64H-57-2 Engine no. XSP 2157-2

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$352,000
Auction archive: Lot number 141

'767 KNX' - The ex-Works, Sebring 12-Hours, Targa Florio 1964 Austin-Healey 3000 MkII Lightweight Chassis no. HBJ7-64H-57-2 Engine no. XSP 2157-2

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$352,000
Beschreibung:

2,912cc Aluminum SOHC Inline 6-Cylinder Engine 3 Weber 45DCOE Carburetors 180bhp (rated) 4-Speed Sebring-Type Manual Transmission 4-Wheel Girling Hydraulic Disc Brakes *1964 Sebring 12 Hours Works entry driven by Paddy Hopkirk *1966 and 1968 Targa Florio entrant *Ex-Ted Worswick *Five owners from new *In remarkably original condition The 3000 MkII A development of the 100/6 rather than a genuinely new model, the Austin-Healey 3000 was launched in March 1959. Improvements to the 3000 included a slightly enlarged engine and Girling disc brakes up front, a development greeted with enthusiasm by devotees of this muscular British sportscar. Like the 100/6, the 3000 was available in two-seater (BN7) and 2+2(BT7) guises and came with wire wheels and adjustable front seats as standard. Unveiled in March 1961, the MkII version with restyled grille and hood intake was the last 3000 available as a two-seater, the 2+2 version having been for years the more popular. Adapted to all manner of motorsport, the 3000 found itself a strong contender in rally, endurance and road racing - proving itself to be a formidable contender in every type of racing it entered. The Motorcar Offered One of only five Works-prepared 3000s set-up for pure circuit racing and described by B.S. Levy in the July 1992 issue of British Cars as "the most historically significant, and certainly the most original Big Healey of the lot", 767 KNX is arguably one of the most notable 3000s produced. Rolling off the factory line and into the Works at Warwick, 767 KNX was meticulously prepared to contest the rigors of endurance racing and help build the reputation of the company in the United States, where Donald and Geoffrey found so much success selling their six-cylinder motorcars. Sebring had been picked as the ultimate show of continued strength and publicity - but prior outings in 1957, '58, and '60 had proven mixed. A pair of 3000 BJ7s, 55 FAC and 54 FAC, had both finished a respectable 12th and 26th, respectively, but this was not enough. The light and quick homologation hard-top Healey bore similarity to a standard BJ7 only in that it carried the same basic profile. Aluminum body panels, a very hotly tuned triple Weber carburetion setup, hotter cams in 6-port aluminum heads, ZF limited-slip differential, and a special racing gearbox made this Big Six a rocket ship. For the big race on March 21st, 1964 the lone Works Austin-Healey entry was entrusted to Paddy Hopkirk, fresh from his legendary victory at the Monte Carlo Rally just two months prior, teamed with Canadian Grant Clark. Classed against the Ferrari 250 GTOs--the only non-Ferrari in its class in fact--767 KNX began the race with Hopkirk at the wheel. A puncture nearly ended the race for him, but he miraculously managed to maintain control of the car. Following a pit stop for fresh rubber, Hopkirk played catch-up until handing the wheel to Clark. Driving hard and continuing to try to make up for lost time, it was mere minutes after the driver change that Clark lost control of the car and ended the team's race, with 767 KNX on its roof after 49 laps. Only lightly damaged, the car was sent back to the Works for repairs. As was customary in those days, Healey simply sold the old racecar to a privateer for no more than the cost of a new road car. Yorkshire woolens magnate Henry R. Crowther was the first private owner, having acquired "one Sebring Austin-Healey '3000' in Healey Ice Blue" for the paltry sum of £1,080 on August 7th, 1964. Crowther retained 767 KNX only briefly before selling it to his friend and renowned Austin-Healey collector and racer Ted Worswick. 767 KNX would be retained by Worswick for the subsequent 26 years, during which time the car was kept in remarkably original condition. In his care, 767 KNX ran the Targa Florio twice - in 1966 and again in 1968 - finishing 29th in its latter outing. A 3rd in class would be achieved at the prestigious Oulton Park GT support race while a handful of other o

Auction archive: Lot number 141
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
Beschreibung:

2,912cc Aluminum SOHC Inline 6-Cylinder Engine 3 Weber 45DCOE Carburetors 180bhp (rated) 4-Speed Sebring-Type Manual Transmission 4-Wheel Girling Hydraulic Disc Brakes *1964 Sebring 12 Hours Works entry driven by Paddy Hopkirk *1966 and 1968 Targa Florio entrant *Ex-Ted Worswick *Five owners from new *In remarkably original condition The 3000 MkII A development of the 100/6 rather than a genuinely new model, the Austin-Healey 3000 was launched in March 1959. Improvements to the 3000 included a slightly enlarged engine and Girling disc brakes up front, a development greeted with enthusiasm by devotees of this muscular British sportscar. Like the 100/6, the 3000 was available in two-seater (BN7) and 2+2(BT7) guises and came with wire wheels and adjustable front seats as standard. Unveiled in March 1961, the MkII version with restyled grille and hood intake was the last 3000 available as a two-seater, the 2+2 version having been for years the more popular. Adapted to all manner of motorsport, the 3000 found itself a strong contender in rally, endurance and road racing - proving itself to be a formidable contender in every type of racing it entered. The Motorcar Offered One of only five Works-prepared 3000s set-up for pure circuit racing and described by B.S. Levy in the July 1992 issue of British Cars as "the most historically significant, and certainly the most original Big Healey of the lot", 767 KNX is arguably one of the most notable 3000s produced. Rolling off the factory line and into the Works at Warwick, 767 KNX was meticulously prepared to contest the rigors of endurance racing and help build the reputation of the company in the United States, where Donald and Geoffrey found so much success selling their six-cylinder motorcars. Sebring had been picked as the ultimate show of continued strength and publicity - but prior outings in 1957, '58, and '60 had proven mixed. A pair of 3000 BJ7s, 55 FAC and 54 FAC, had both finished a respectable 12th and 26th, respectively, but this was not enough. The light and quick homologation hard-top Healey bore similarity to a standard BJ7 only in that it carried the same basic profile. Aluminum body panels, a very hotly tuned triple Weber carburetion setup, hotter cams in 6-port aluminum heads, ZF limited-slip differential, and a special racing gearbox made this Big Six a rocket ship. For the big race on March 21st, 1964 the lone Works Austin-Healey entry was entrusted to Paddy Hopkirk, fresh from his legendary victory at the Monte Carlo Rally just two months prior, teamed with Canadian Grant Clark. Classed against the Ferrari 250 GTOs--the only non-Ferrari in its class in fact--767 KNX began the race with Hopkirk at the wheel. A puncture nearly ended the race for him, but he miraculously managed to maintain control of the car. Following a pit stop for fresh rubber, Hopkirk played catch-up until handing the wheel to Clark. Driving hard and continuing to try to make up for lost time, it was mere minutes after the driver change that Clark lost control of the car and ended the team's race, with 767 KNX on its roof after 49 laps. Only lightly damaged, the car was sent back to the Works for repairs. As was customary in those days, Healey simply sold the old racecar to a privateer for no more than the cost of a new road car. Yorkshire woolens magnate Henry R. Crowther was the first private owner, having acquired "one Sebring Austin-Healey '3000' in Healey Ice Blue" for the paltry sum of £1,080 on August 7th, 1964. Crowther retained 767 KNX only briefly before selling it to his friend and renowned Austin-Healey collector and racer Ted Worswick. 767 KNX would be retained by Worswick for the subsequent 26 years, during which time the car was kept in remarkably original condition. In his care, 767 KNX ran the Targa Florio twice - in 1966 and again in 1968 - finishing 29th in its latter outing. A 3rd in class would be achieved at the prestigious Oulton Park GT support race while a handful of other o

Auction archive: Lot number 141
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
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