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Auction archive: Lot number 41

A Second War 1944 ‘Normandy Operations

Estimate
£1,200 - £1,600
ca. US$1,563 - US$2,084
Price realised:
£1,300
ca. US$1,693
Auction archive: Lot number 41

A Second War 1944 ‘Normandy Operations

Estimate
£1,200 - £1,600
ca. US$1,563 - US$2,084
Price realised:
£1,300
ca. US$1,693
Beschreibung:

A Second War 1944 ‘Normandy Operations’ M.C. group of five awarded to Major N. J. Newton, Dorsetshire Regiment, for his gallantry during the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine on 10 July 1944, during which the Battalion killed a large number of the enemy, took 80 prisoners, and captured many important maps and documents; Newton himself was subsequently wounded on 21 July when his Battalion Headquarters was heavily mortared Military Cross, G.VI.R. reverse officially dated 1944 and additionally privately engraved ‘Major N. J. Newton. Dorset Regt. Normandy. July 10th.’; 1939-45 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals 1939-45, mounted as worn, good very fine (5) £1200-1600 Footnote M.C. London Gazette 19 October 1944. The recommendation, dated 30 August 1944, states: ‘During the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine on 10 July 1944, Major Newton was in command of the forward Company. Under his leadership his company reached its objective as planned, having killed and captured a large number of the enemy. Major Newton next led his Company against its second objective, which necessitated an attack in the face of heavy close range fire from enemy tanks. The Company suffered severely and subsequently had to be withdrawn. Major Newton himself remained behind with two men and a Piat and made two attempts to stalk a tank through the corn. Movement, however, brought such fire that he was forced to abandon this project. He then crawled back to his company a considerable distance away bringing with him a wounded soldier. Throughout the action Major Newton’s leadership and disregard for his own safety were an inspiration to the whole of his Company which was in action for the first time. Major Newton has since been wounded and evacuated.’ Norman James Newton landed with the 5th Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment in the ‘Gold Sector’ on 23 June 1944, and was stationed at St. Mauvieu. After two weeks spent in reconnaissance and planning, orders were given for the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine. ‘During the night of 9-10 July, the Battalion moved by march to an assembly area at Mouen, prior to the planned attack on the Chateau de Fontaine. Shortly after 05:00 hours “C” Company (Major N. J. Newton) on the right, with two troops of tanks in support, signalled the capture of Les Daunes. “D” Company (Major K. W. G. Roe) on the left reported, after fighting for it, Horseshoe Wood was clear, and the reserve companies were ordered to move up. No further news from “C” Company was received as their wireless had been destroyed. However, they were apparently in difficulties in the area of the Chateau, and so the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel B. A. Coad, went to see for himself. Meanwhile the supporting arms were brought forward to a position behind Horseshoe Wood and news was received that the 4th Dorsets had taken Eterville. At 08:00 hours it was reported that the tanks were suffering casualties from some 88mm guns away to the right, and “C” Company were ordered to put in an attack. The trouble appeared to come from a small wood, in which were found three Tiger tanks and some infantry. The infantry were dealt with at the cost of severe casualties, but they were unable to silence the tanks. Owing to the precariousness of the position orders were given for the withdrawal and the Battalion was reorganised around the fortress of the Chateau. The Battalion had acquitted itself well, having encountered the cream of the German Army, the 10th S.S. Panzer Division. A large number of the enemy had been killed, about 80 prisoners taken, and many important maps and documents captured. Major Newton and Lieutenant Wetherbee, both of “C” Company, won the Military Cross, and Corporal Murray, also of “C” Company, the M.M. For the next eight days the Battalion maintained its position at the Chateau, which came to be known as the Fortress, in the face of intense mortaring and shelling. Major Newton took over the duties of second-in-command of the Battalio

Auction archive: Lot number 41
Auction:
Datum:
19 Jul 2017 - 20 Jul 2017
Auction house:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
United Kingdom
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
Beschreibung:

A Second War 1944 ‘Normandy Operations’ M.C. group of five awarded to Major N. J. Newton, Dorsetshire Regiment, for his gallantry during the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine on 10 July 1944, during which the Battalion killed a large number of the enemy, took 80 prisoners, and captured many important maps and documents; Newton himself was subsequently wounded on 21 July when his Battalion Headquarters was heavily mortared Military Cross, G.VI.R. reverse officially dated 1944 and additionally privately engraved ‘Major N. J. Newton. Dorset Regt. Normandy. July 10th.’; 1939-45 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals 1939-45, mounted as worn, good very fine (5) £1200-1600 Footnote M.C. London Gazette 19 October 1944. The recommendation, dated 30 August 1944, states: ‘During the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine on 10 July 1944, Major Newton was in command of the forward Company. Under his leadership his company reached its objective as planned, having killed and captured a large number of the enemy. Major Newton next led his Company against its second objective, which necessitated an attack in the face of heavy close range fire from enemy tanks. The Company suffered severely and subsequently had to be withdrawn. Major Newton himself remained behind with two men and a Piat and made two attempts to stalk a tank through the corn. Movement, however, brought such fire that he was forced to abandon this project. He then crawled back to his company a considerable distance away bringing with him a wounded soldier. Throughout the action Major Newton’s leadership and disregard for his own safety were an inspiration to the whole of his Company which was in action for the first time. Major Newton has since been wounded and evacuated.’ Norman James Newton landed with the 5th Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment in the ‘Gold Sector’ on 23 June 1944, and was stationed at St. Mauvieu. After two weeks spent in reconnaissance and planning, orders were given for the attack on the Chateau de Fontaine. ‘During the night of 9-10 July, the Battalion moved by march to an assembly area at Mouen, prior to the planned attack on the Chateau de Fontaine. Shortly after 05:00 hours “C” Company (Major N. J. Newton) on the right, with two troops of tanks in support, signalled the capture of Les Daunes. “D” Company (Major K. W. G. Roe) on the left reported, after fighting for it, Horseshoe Wood was clear, and the reserve companies were ordered to move up. No further news from “C” Company was received as their wireless had been destroyed. However, they were apparently in difficulties in the area of the Chateau, and so the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel B. A. Coad, went to see for himself. Meanwhile the supporting arms were brought forward to a position behind Horseshoe Wood and news was received that the 4th Dorsets had taken Eterville. At 08:00 hours it was reported that the tanks were suffering casualties from some 88mm guns away to the right, and “C” Company were ordered to put in an attack. The trouble appeared to come from a small wood, in which were found three Tiger tanks and some infantry. The infantry were dealt with at the cost of severe casualties, but they were unable to silence the tanks. Owing to the precariousness of the position orders were given for the withdrawal and the Battalion was reorganised around the fortress of the Chateau. The Battalion had acquitted itself well, having encountered the cream of the German Army, the 10th S.S. Panzer Division. A large number of the enemy had been killed, about 80 prisoners taken, and many important maps and documents captured. Major Newton and Lieutenant Wetherbee, both of “C” Company, won the Military Cross, and Corporal Murray, also of “C” Company, the M.M. For the next eight days the Battalion maintained its position at the Chateau, which came to be known as the Fortress, in the face of intense mortaring and shelling. Major Newton took over the duties of second-in-command of the Battalio

Auction archive: Lot number 41
Auction:
Datum:
19 Jul 2017 - 20 Jul 2017
Auction house:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
United Kingdom
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
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