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Auction archive: Lot number 142

Gold Roosevelt Memorial Association Medal of Honor Presented to Hamlin Garland

Coins and Medals
11 Jun 2018
Estimate
US$18,000 - US$25,000
Price realised:
US$18,000
Auction archive: Lot number 142

Gold Roosevelt Memorial Association Medal of Honor Presented to Hamlin Garland

Coins and Medals
11 Jun 2018
Estimate
US$18,000 - US$25,000
Price realised:
US$18,000
Beschreibung:

Diameter: 3.25 inches, weight: 374.8 grams. The obverse features a bust of Theodore Roosevelt facing right, FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE is above, JE FRASER 1920 (the designer) is to the left, and MDCCCLVIII (1858) MCMXIX (1919) is to the lower right. On the reverse, ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION MEDAL OF HONOR circles the peripheral area, with the legend IF I MUST CHOOSEBETWEEN RIGHTEOUSNESS AND PEACE I CHOOSE RIGHTEOUNESS. Each side presents an "as issued" appearance with no wear or distractions evident. The deep golden medal presents a matte-like appearance and is housed in an antique louped frame. This rare medal has been in the possession of Hamlin Garland's family since it was awarded to him in 1931. To date, only 136 Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service Medals have been awarded to date, none since 2011. This is a rare offering at public auction. Hamlin Garland 1860-1940 Hannibal Hamlin Garland (September 14, 1860 – March 4, 1940) was an American novelist, poet, essayist, short story writer, Georgist, and psychical researcher. He is best known for his fiction involving hard-working Midwestern farmers. Hannibal Hamlin Garland was born on a farm near West Salem, Wisconsin, on September 14, 1860, the second of four children of Richard Garland of Maine and Charlotte Isabelle McClintock. The boy was named after Hannibal Hamlin, the candidate for vice-president under Abraham Lincoln. He lived on various Midwestern farms throughout his young life, but settled in Boston, Massachusetts in 1884 to pursue a career in writing. He read diligently in the Boston Public Library where he became enamored with the ideas of Henry George and his Single Tax Movement. George's ideas came to influence a number of his works, such as Main-Travelled Roads (1891), Prairie Folks (1892), and his novel Jason Edwards (1892). Main-Travelled Roads was his first major success. It was a collection of short stories inspired by his days on the farm. He serialized a biography of Ulysses S. Grant in McClure's Magazine before publishing it as a book in 1898. The same year, Garland traveled to the Yukon to witness the Klondike Gold Rush, which inspired The Trail of the Gold Seekers (1899). He lived on a farm between Osage, and St. Ansgar, Iowa for quite some time. Many of his writings are based on this era of his life. A prolific writer, Garland continued to publish novels, short fiction, and essays. In 1917, he published his autobiography, A Son of the Middle Border. The book's success prompted a sequel, A Daughter of the Middle Border, for which Garland won the 1922 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. After two more volumes, Garland began a second series of memoirs based on his diary. Garland naturally became quite well known during his lifetime and had many friends in literary circles. He was made a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1918. After moving to Hollywood, California, in 1929, he devoted much of his time investigating psychic phenomena, an enthusiasm he first undertook in 1891. In his final book, The Mystery of the Buried Crosses (1939), he tried to defend such phenomena and prove the legitimacy of psychic mediums. A friend, Lee Shippey, columnist for the Los Angeles Times, recalled Garland's regular system of writing: ". . . he got up at half past five, brewed a pot of coffee and made toast on an electric gadget in his study and was at work by six. At nine o'clock he was through with work for the day. Then he breakfasted, read the morning paper and attended to his personal mail. . . . After luncheon he and Mrs. Garland would take a long drive . . . . Sometimes they would drop in on Will Rogers Will Durant, Robert Benchley or even on me, for their range of friends was very wide. . . . After dinner they would go to a show if an exceptionally good one were in town, otherwise one of their daughters would read aloud." In 1931, Garland was awarded the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service medal for his work as a novelist, playwright

Auction archive: Lot number 142
Auction:
Datum:
11 Jun 2018
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Los Angeles 7601 W. Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles CA 90046 Tel: +1 323 850 7500 Fax : +1 323 850 6090 [email protected]
Beschreibung:

Diameter: 3.25 inches, weight: 374.8 grams. The obverse features a bust of Theodore Roosevelt facing right, FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE is above, JE FRASER 1920 (the designer) is to the left, and MDCCCLVIII (1858) MCMXIX (1919) is to the lower right. On the reverse, ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION MEDAL OF HONOR circles the peripheral area, with the legend IF I MUST CHOOSEBETWEEN RIGHTEOUSNESS AND PEACE I CHOOSE RIGHTEOUNESS. Each side presents an "as issued" appearance with no wear or distractions evident. The deep golden medal presents a matte-like appearance and is housed in an antique louped frame. This rare medal has been in the possession of Hamlin Garland's family since it was awarded to him in 1931. To date, only 136 Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service Medals have been awarded to date, none since 2011. This is a rare offering at public auction. Hamlin Garland 1860-1940 Hannibal Hamlin Garland (September 14, 1860 – March 4, 1940) was an American novelist, poet, essayist, short story writer, Georgist, and psychical researcher. He is best known for his fiction involving hard-working Midwestern farmers. Hannibal Hamlin Garland was born on a farm near West Salem, Wisconsin, on September 14, 1860, the second of four children of Richard Garland of Maine and Charlotte Isabelle McClintock. The boy was named after Hannibal Hamlin, the candidate for vice-president under Abraham Lincoln. He lived on various Midwestern farms throughout his young life, but settled in Boston, Massachusetts in 1884 to pursue a career in writing. He read diligently in the Boston Public Library where he became enamored with the ideas of Henry George and his Single Tax Movement. George's ideas came to influence a number of his works, such as Main-Travelled Roads (1891), Prairie Folks (1892), and his novel Jason Edwards (1892). Main-Travelled Roads was his first major success. It was a collection of short stories inspired by his days on the farm. He serialized a biography of Ulysses S. Grant in McClure's Magazine before publishing it as a book in 1898. The same year, Garland traveled to the Yukon to witness the Klondike Gold Rush, which inspired The Trail of the Gold Seekers (1899). He lived on a farm between Osage, and St. Ansgar, Iowa for quite some time. Many of his writings are based on this era of his life. A prolific writer, Garland continued to publish novels, short fiction, and essays. In 1917, he published his autobiography, A Son of the Middle Border. The book's success prompted a sequel, A Daughter of the Middle Border, for which Garland won the 1922 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. After two more volumes, Garland began a second series of memoirs based on his diary. Garland naturally became quite well known during his lifetime and had many friends in literary circles. He was made a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1918. After moving to Hollywood, California, in 1929, he devoted much of his time investigating psychic phenomena, an enthusiasm he first undertook in 1891. In his final book, The Mystery of the Buried Crosses (1939), he tried to defend such phenomena and prove the legitimacy of psychic mediums. A friend, Lee Shippey, columnist for the Los Angeles Times, recalled Garland's regular system of writing: ". . . he got up at half past five, brewed a pot of coffee and made toast on an electric gadget in his study and was at work by six. At nine o'clock he was through with work for the day. Then he breakfasted, read the morning paper and attended to his personal mail. . . . After luncheon he and Mrs. Garland would take a long drive . . . . Sometimes they would drop in on Will Rogers Will Durant, Robert Benchley or even on me, for their range of friends was very wide. . . . After dinner they would go to a show if an exceptionally good one were in town, otherwise one of their daughters would read aloud." In 1931, Garland was awarded the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service medal for his work as a novelist, playwright

Auction archive: Lot number 142
Auction:
Datum:
11 Jun 2018
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Los Angeles 7601 W. Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles CA 90046 Tel: +1 323 850 7500 Fax : +1 323 850 6090 [email protected]
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