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Auction archive: Lot number 192

also known as La Chute des Feuilles, or Falling Leaves, originally attributed to …

Auction 27.07.2017
27 Jul 2017
Estimate
£800 - £1,200
ca. US$1,046 - US$1,569
Price realised:
£400
ca. US$523
Auction archive: Lot number 192

also known as La Chute des Feuilles, or Falling Leaves, originally attributed to …

Auction 27.07.2017
27 Jul 2017
Estimate
£800 - £1,200
ca. US$1,046 - US$1,569
Price realised:
£400
ca. US$523
Beschreibung:

also known as La Chute des Feuilles, or Falling Leaves, originally attributed to Millet, with exhibition and provenance labels from that period in its history, but later determined to be the work of Barbizon forgers in the circle of the artist's grandson, Jean Charles Millet oil on panel, 465 x 375mm. (18 1/4 x 14 3/4 in), bears signature stamp, J.F.M., [Lugt 1460a], lower right, Barbizon House Gallery label, and early exhibition or auction catalogue text on verso, n.d., [?c.1920]. *** Provenance: Barbizon House Gallery; Sir Gervase Beckett, Bt.: Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1925/6.thank Alexandra R. Murphy for her invaluable assistance in placing this piece in the fascinating context of a body of work that appeared in the 1920s, and successfully circulated as the genuine work of Jean François Millet (1814-1875), before being revealed as a scandal that rocked the art world. The signature stamp that appears on this panel is a hybrid of the artist's studio stamp [Lugt 1460], which it most closely resembles, and his widow's estate stamp [Lugt 1460b]. Lugt describes it simply as 'false', but it was probably created in good faith by Jean Charles Millet the artist's grandson, to authenticate lesser or atypical works that had remained in the family over the decades since the artist's death, as it is known on around a dozen genuine pieces. it seems that around 1920 he began to use it to 'authenticate' work produced by a team of forgers operating in Millet's home town of Barbizon. These were characteristically similar to, but with distinct differences from, known works, as is the case here with more finished genuine oils and pastels of the same title or theme. The overlapping compositional elements lend credibility, but the underlying limitations in technique and palette give it away to the informed eye. David Croal Thomson specialised in 19th century French painting at his Barbizon House Gallery in London, and had sold many genuine works by Millet, as well as by Daumier, Rousseau and others. But he also innocently acquired a number of forgeries from Jean Charles, with the elaborately constructed fake provenance he also provided, before becoming suspicious and eventually playing a significant role on bringing the forgers to justice.

Auction archive: Lot number 192
Auction:
Datum:
27 Jul 2017
Auction house:
Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions
16-17 Pall Mall
St James’s
London, SW1Y 5LU
United Kingdom
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 78398880
Beschreibung:

also known as La Chute des Feuilles, or Falling Leaves, originally attributed to Millet, with exhibition and provenance labels from that period in its history, but later determined to be the work of Barbizon forgers in the circle of the artist's grandson, Jean Charles Millet oil on panel, 465 x 375mm. (18 1/4 x 14 3/4 in), bears signature stamp, J.F.M., [Lugt 1460a], lower right, Barbizon House Gallery label, and early exhibition or auction catalogue text on verso, n.d., [?c.1920]. *** Provenance: Barbizon House Gallery; Sir Gervase Beckett, Bt.: Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1925/6.thank Alexandra R. Murphy for her invaluable assistance in placing this piece in the fascinating context of a body of work that appeared in the 1920s, and successfully circulated as the genuine work of Jean François Millet (1814-1875), before being revealed as a scandal that rocked the art world. The signature stamp that appears on this panel is a hybrid of the artist's studio stamp [Lugt 1460], which it most closely resembles, and his widow's estate stamp [Lugt 1460b]. Lugt describes it simply as 'false', but it was probably created in good faith by Jean Charles Millet the artist's grandson, to authenticate lesser or atypical works that had remained in the family over the decades since the artist's death, as it is known on around a dozen genuine pieces. it seems that around 1920 he began to use it to 'authenticate' work produced by a team of forgers operating in Millet's home town of Barbizon. These were characteristically similar to, but with distinct differences from, known works, as is the case here with more finished genuine oils and pastels of the same title or theme. The overlapping compositional elements lend credibility, but the underlying limitations in technique and palette give it away to the informed eye. David Croal Thomson specialised in 19th century French painting at his Barbizon House Gallery in London, and had sold many genuine works by Millet, as well as by Daumier, Rousseau and others. But he also innocently acquired a number of forgeries from Jean Charles, with the elaborately constructed fake provenance he also provided, before becoming suspicious and eventually playing a significant role on bringing the forgers to justice.

Auction archive: Lot number 192
Auction:
Datum:
27 Jul 2017
Auction house:
Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions
16-17 Pall Mall
St James’s
London, SW1Y 5LU
United Kingdom
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 78398880
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