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Auction archive: Lot number 169

The Bruxelles Motor Show 1965 Ferrari 275GTS Coachwork by Pininfarina Chassis no. 07799 Engine no. 07799

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$1,045,000
Auction archive: Lot number 169

The Bruxelles Motor Show 1965 Ferrari 275GTS Coachwork by Pininfarina Chassis no. 07799 Engine no. 07799

Quail Lodge Auction
16 Aug 2013
Estimate
US$0
Price realised:
US$1,045,000
Beschreibung:

3,285cc SOHC V12 Engine 260bhp at 7,000rpm 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Delivered new as factory show car in Oro Chiaro over Rosso Scuro *Exceptionally well presented example with matching numbers engine *Prominent ownership history and kept by first owner for 34 years *One of Ferrari's best driving open top road cars *Documented history by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini The Ferrari 275GTS There had been open-top Ferrari road cars before the advent of the 250 series, but it was, chiefly, Pininfarina's offerings on the later chassis that established the convertible as a fixture of the Ferrari range. After the experimentation and variety which characterized the coachwork of the 250-series cars, the arrival of the 275 in 1964 brought with it bodywork being manufactured by Pininfarina themselves, with a considerably improved build quality. The chassis followed Ferrari's established practice, incorporating a multi-tubular frame tied together by oval main tubes, and for the first time on a road-going Ferrari there was independent rear suspension, this setup employing a double wishbone and coil-spring arrangement similar to that of the 250LM sports-racer. The adoption of a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle combining the now all-synchromesh gearbox and differential in a single unit helped improve weight distribution, and this feature would characterize future generations of front-engined Ferrari road cars. By the mid 1960s, Ferrari's road cars were beginning to lose some of their rougher edges and take on a more luxurious mien. The 275GTS's interior is notable for its generously sized seats and wood veneer dashboard, the latter appearing for the first time in a Ferrari. Even the most sybaritic of customers, though, would acknowledge that the driving experience is the raison d'ętre of Ferrari ownership, and in this respect the 275GTS had lost none of its predecessors' aggressive charm. Car & Driver magazine had this to say: "Since the engine is heir to a V12 tradition that's gone on for almost twenty years, it's only natural that it should be the dominating factor in the car's personality, and that the whole car should have been developed around the engine and its own unique character. You can feel it as much as you can hear it. It has a taut, powerful rush of response that comes to you through the seat of your pants, through the steering wheel rim. The instant the clutch is engaged, the chassis takes on life and begins to move as a unit with the engine, it's an all-in-one-piece sensation that you normally feel only in racing cars, one that's unique to the Ferrari among normal passenger vehicles today." The Motorcar Offered Built during the last few months of 1965, this fine example of Ferrari's mid-sixties Spider, chassis no. 07799, was the 143rd 275GTS completed in a production run of just 200 cars. 181 of these were configured with left hand drive. 07799 was given Pininfarina body no. 175143, and finished in the excellent soft gold metallic color Oro Chiaro and fitted with a Rosso Scuro (red) interior. It was a left hand drive example destined for European delivery, fitted with metric, kilometers per hour gauges. Upon its completion, 07799 was delivered by the Ferrari factory in-house delivery logistics team to the Belgian importer Garage Francorchamps SA, for display at the Bruxelles Motor Show, held early January of 1966. The striking new Ferrari Spider must have been what every attendee with a taste for Italian sports cars came to see – a thoroughly modern car tastefully finished in a very chic livery. It appears the car was only on loan to Garage Francorchamps, as 07799 was transported back to Maranello after the motor show. In February 1966, 07799 was sold to its first owner, Juan Quintano Halpern of Madrid, Spain, through the Spanish Ferrari importer, Tayre SA, also based in Madrid. Mr. Quintano, a true Ferrari devotee, was surely very pleased with the fine Italian thoroughbred

Auction archive: Lot number 169
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
Beschreibung:

3,285cc SOHC V12 Engine 260bhp at 7,000rpm 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Delivered new as factory show car in Oro Chiaro over Rosso Scuro *Exceptionally well presented example with matching numbers engine *Prominent ownership history and kept by first owner for 34 years *One of Ferrari's best driving open top road cars *Documented history by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini The Ferrari 275GTS There had been open-top Ferrari road cars before the advent of the 250 series, but it was, chiefly, Pininfarina's offerings on the later chassis that established the convertible as a fixture of the Ferrari range. After the experimentation and variety which characterized the coachwork of the 250-series cars, the arrival of the 275 in 1964 brought with it bodywork being manufactured by Pininfarina themselves, with a considerably improved build quality. The chassis followed Ferrari's established practice, incorporating a multi-tubular frame tied together by oval main tubes, and for the first time on a road-going Ferrari there was independent rear suspension, this setup employing a double wishbone and coil-spring arrangement similar to that of the 250LM sports-racer. The adoption of a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle combining the now all-synchromesh gearbox and differential in a single unit helped improve weight distribution, and this feature would characterize future generations of front-engined Ferrari road cars. By the mid 1960s, Ferrari's road cars were beginning to lose some of their rougher edges and take on a more luxurious mien. The 275GTS's interior is notable for its generously sized seats and wood veneer dashboard, the latter appearing for the first time in a Ferrari. Even the most sybaritic of customers, though, would acknowledge that the driving experience is the raison d'ętre of Ferrari ownership, and in this respect the 275GTS had lost none of its predecessors' aggressive charm. Car & Driver magazine had this to say: "Since the engine is heir to a V12 tradition that's gone on for almost twenty years, it's only natural that it should be the dominating factor in the car's personality, and that the whole car should have been developed around the engine and its own unique character. You can feel it as much as you can hear it. It has a taut, powerful rush of response that comes to you through the seat of your pants, through the steering wheel rim. The instant the clutch is engaged, the chassis takes on life and begins to move as a unit with the engine, it's an all-in-one-piece sensation that you normally feel only in racing cars, one that's unique to the Ferrari among normal passenger vehicles today." The Motorcar Offered Built during the last few months of 1965, this fine example of Ferrari's mid-sixties Spider, chassis no. 07799, was the 143rd 275GTS completed in a production run of just 200 cars. 181 of these were configured with left hand drive. 07799 was given Pininfarina body no. 175143, and finished in the excellent soft gold metallic color Oro Chiaro and fitted with a Rosso Scuro (red) interior. It was a left hand drive example destined for European delivery, fitted with metric, kilometers per hour gauges. Upon its completion, 07799 was delivered by the Ferrari factory in-house delivery logistics team to the Belgian importer Garage Francorchamps SA, for display at the Bruxelles Motor Show, held early January of 1966. The striking new Ferrari Spider must have been what every attendee with a taste for Italian sports cars came to see – a thoroughly modern car tastefully finished in a very chic livery. It appears the car was only on loan to Garage Francorchamps, as 07799 was transported back to Maranello after the motor show. In February 1966, 07799 was sold to its first owner, Juan Quintano Halpern of Madrid, Spain, through the Spanish Ferrari importer, Tayre SA, also based in Madrid. Mr. Quintano, a true Ferrari devotee, was surely very pleased with the fine Italian thoroughbred

Auction archive: Lot number 169
Auction:
Datum:
16 Aug 2013
Auction house:
Bonhams London
Carmel, Quail Lodge Quail Lodge's West Field 7000 Valley Greens Drive (at Rancho San Carlos Rd) Carmel CA 93923 Tel: +1 415 391 4000 Fax : +1 415 391 4040 [email protected]
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